• Underground Tamarack Trammer Car

    Keweenaw

    National Historical Park Michigan

Fourth Thursday in History: The White Pine Townsite

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Date: August 23, 2010
Contact: Ellen Schrader, 906-337-3168

 Like many towns in the Keweenaw, White Pine was developed by a copper mining company. While it has a few things in common with these other mine locations, it remains a unique place. Join Professor Larry Lankton as he describes the community's history and leads a tour of the town's highlights.

Keweenaw copper mines started building mine towns in the 1840s. Over a century later, they were still doing it. The community of White Pine, planned and built by the Copper Range mining company in the early 1950s, was the last company-built community in the region. In some ways, in its purpose and in its housing, schools, churches, hospital, and other social institutions, White Pine mirrored earlier mine locations like Painesdale, which Copper Range developed a half-century earlier. However, with its single-story ranch houses, garages, and trailer court, White Pine was a unique post-World War II industrial "suburb."

Professor Lankton will draw upon his latest work, Hollowed Ground: Copper Mining and Community Building on Lake Superior, 1840s-1990s, for this special presentation. The Isle Royale and Keweenaw Parks Association will have copies available for purchase and signing at the event; following, Lankton will offer a tour of the community, highlighting places of note.      

This program will be held at 7:00 pm on Thursday, August 26th, at the White Pine Community United Methodist Church, located at 9 Tamarack Street in White Pine, Michigan. It is part of the Fourth Thursday in History program sponsored by Keweenaw National Historical Park.

The Fourth Thursday in History series arranges public presentations on important aspects of Copper Country and regional history, including techniques for historic preservation. Presentations are scheduled in venues throughout the

Keweenaw Peninsula , particularly at historic sites associated with specific topics. They are free and open to the public.

For further information, including specific directions to this event, contact Keweenaw National Historical Park at 906/337-3168

Did You Know?

A small memorial park in Calumet, Michigan where the Italian Hall once stood is for the 74 people killed in a stampede on Dec. 24, 1913.

Woody Guthrie's song "1913 Massacre" brought attention to a tragedy that occurred in Calumet, Michigan on December 24, 1913 during a bitter copper miner's strike. Reports claim that a shout of fire caused panic at a party at the Italian Hall. 73 people died in the stampede down the steep stairway.