• Glacier in Kenai Fjords National Park

    Kenai Fjords

    National Park Alaska

July 2013 Monthly Weather Summary

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Date: August 26, 2013
Contact: Deb Kurtz, (907) 422-0544

The warmer-than-normal temperatures experienced in June continued into July in the Kenai Fjords area. Temperatures above 70 degrees F were recorded at the Seward airport on eight days, including one day, July 18th, when the temperature climbed to 81 degrees F, setting a new maximum temperature for the day. The warm temperatures in July 2013 contrasted starkly with the cool July of 2012 when the average monthly temperature was 6.2 degrees F less than this year. Precipitation was also notable in July. As recorded at the Seward airport, more than two times the July average precipitation was received during the first seven days of the month. 2.77 inches, (nearly 100% of the 30-year average for the month), were received in a single day, July 1st. The last three weeks of the month were dry with only .03 inches of precipitation recorded on two separate days during the final week of the month.

Above normal temperatures were reported throughout Kenai Fjords National Park. The Harding Icefield, Pedersen Lagoon, and McArthur Pass Remote Automated Weather Stations (RAWS) and the Exit Glacier SNOTEL each recorded maximum high average temperatures for the month for their relatively short, yet expanding, periods of record (9, 2, 6, and 2 years, respectively). Temperatures at the Harding Icefield RAWS, located at 4,200 feet, are most notable. The average temperature for the month was 5.6 degrees F above the July average for the eight year period of record for that station.

As recorded at the Seward airport, total precipitation for the month was 6.28 inches (224% of normal), 3.48 inches above the 30-year average (1981-2010) for the month.The monthly average temperature for July was 58.96 degrees F; 2.96 degrees Fabovethe 30-year average. In general, winds were relatively calm throughout the month with maximum average wind speeds of 12.8 mph recorded on July 20th.

Also of note:                                                                                        

 

Read more to find out about the local climate for July 2013

Did You Know?

Hoary Marmot

The Hoary Marmot is the largest member of the ground squirrels. These guys hibernate half or more of their life away. They have very thick fur and a substantial fat layer that protects them from the cold. You are not as likely to see them on hot days as they hide in the shade to keep cool.