• Structure 17, Glassblowing and Island Drive

    Historic Jamestowne

    Part of Colonial National Historical Park Virginia

The Home of Governor Harvey - 1630s

NPS archeology team excavates structure 112, probable site of Governor Sir John Harvey's home

Jamestown Archeological Assessment team excavates structure 112, probable site of Sir John Harvey's home

National Park Service photograph

John Harvey served as a member of a royal commission investigating conditions in Virginia in 1624. As a reward, he received land at the east end of New Towne, where he probably built a residence and wharf.

When newly-knighted Sir John Harvey returned from England in 1630 as Jamestown’s new governor, he acquired this prime New Towne lot. It was likely here where he built his fine house, which often served as a statehouse during the 1630s.

Although the Crown replaced the contentious Sir John as governor in 1639, his house continued to be used as the statehouse into the 1650s, and also provided a town residence for Governor Sir William Berkeley. After Nathaniel Bacon’s followers burned the capital in 1676, the house was rebuilt a final time.

 

Did You Know?

White mulberries of Jamestown

English settlers were encouraged to plant mulberry trees to help their silk production attempts. (Silkworms eat mulberry leaves.) Red mulberry is native to North America but the silkworms preferred the white mulberries of the Orient. Today Jamestown has both red and white mulberry trees.