• Structure 17, Glassblowing and Island Drive

    Historic Jamestowne

    Part of Colonial National Historical Park Virginia

More Than a Fort: Historic Jamestowne's New Towne

detail of map of Historic JamestowneTownsite with numbers corresponding to different waysides in New Towne
a detail from the site guide of Historic Jamestowne's townsite. The blue area is the James River; each number corresponds to a wayside and/or other interpretive media related to that location.
NPS image
 

Jamestown quickly began expanding beyond the boundaries of the three-sided fort first built on the banks of the James River in 1607. In the 1620s, surveyor William Claiborne mapped out the area to the east of the fort. This land was quickly occupied and used for a variety of purposes by a variety of Jamestown inhabitants and visitors. Use the links below to learn more about the 17th-century story of New Towne, a busy part of Virginia's first capital.

 

Did You Know?

Atlantic Sturgeon scutes recovered at James Fort.

Sturgeons have five rows of bony plates, called scutes, covering the head and body. These scutes are often found in the excavation of James Fort; the abundance of scutes in the archeological record supports the historical record.