• Congress Voting Independence

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    National Historical Park Pennsylvania

I Declare by Anonymous

July 18, 2013 Posted by: Anonymous
I declare that though we have the right to remain silent, we have a duty to speak out against oppression.

I explain to you that there are people who do not have a voice or do not know how to use it.

I can use my voice.  You can use yours.

I will listen to those who need to be heard.

I will aid anyone who needs my help, from finding a bathroom to finding medical care.

I realize that many will argue that these small kindnesses are a waste of time and therefore useless.

I explicitly disagree.  No act of kindness, however small, is ever wasted. 

13 Comments Comments Icon

  1. Amber Davis - Philadelphia, PA
    July 25, 2013 at 12:23

    Very well said! The voice is a tool use to chop down the weeds of oppression. Even acts of kindness speak volumes!

  2. Amy - Lowell, MA
    July 22, 2013 at 07:30

    These words strike me as they range from speaking out against oppression to helping someone find a bathroom. Both are human needs on a seemingly different level but is one more important than the other in a time of need?

  3. Bethany - Philadelphia, PA
    July 21, 2013 at 06:32

    I can't believe that I didn't notice the first time I read this that the first letters of the words in bold read 'declare'! Glad that you told me that in class! What a creative take on this assignment, and what an interesting way to use your warrant (in the second-to-last line) that others might argue in order to set up your final claim (in the last line)!

  4. Rita - Drexel Hill, PA
    July 21, 2013 at 10:30

    Your "I Declare" is a credo that reminds me of the "butterfly" effect. We are interdependent. Our actions matter from the caring for the smallest of insects to showing kindness to strangers, our seemingly little actions will have long-reaching results.

  5. Peggy - Natchitoches, Louisiana
    July 19, 2013 at 03:06

    It reminds me of a car accident I saw recently. The young person with me said, "I know how to do CPR" as she just stood there. In contrast, another woman yelled, "watch my stuff" and ran out into the scene of the accident. That is the big difference between words and action.

  6. John - Seneca Falls, NY
    July 19, 2013 at 01:54

    Anonymous: Good post -- clear, concise, effective use of bold type and action verbs. You express goals worth achieving, too.

  7. Helen - Philadelphia, PA
    July 19, 2013 at 01:53

    I wish more people saw it as their duty to speak out against oppression. And I agree that acts of kindness go a long way to change the world.

  8. John - Seneca Falls, NY
    July 19, 2013 at 01:53

    Anonymous: Good post -- clear, concise, effective use of bold type and action verbs. You express goals worth achieving, too.

  9. Amelia - Chicago, Illinois
    July 19, 2013 at 12:01

    I agree with Renee. It's much easier to use your words, and sometimes be anonymous (like you), than to stand out from other people and physically help someone. Just like words can sometimes hurt, words can help very much. This is very well written, too.

  10. Renee - Philadelphia, PA
    July 18, 2013 at 07:42

    I think it's actually easier to speak out against oppression (words) than to aid anyone who needs assistance (actions).

  11. Sam - New York City, NY
    July 18, 2013 at 06:58

    What wonderful guidelines for life.

  12. Jerry - Philadelphia, PA
    July 18, 2013 at 06:54

    Excellent! Well said. Helping someone makes them feel good almost as good as you feel from doing it.

  13. Marci
    July 18, 2013 at 06:04

    So absolutely true, anonymous. An act of kindness can mean so much more than you can ever imagine.

 

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Did You Know?

Drawing of slaves

Many American patriots owned slaves before, during or after the Revolution. Here are a few you might know: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Rush, James Madison, Robert Morris, and James Wilson. Many of them spoke out against slavery, but only Washington freed 124 people by his will.