• Pink flowers blossom in the garden of a white two-room cottage.

    Herbert Hoover

    National Historic Site Iowa

Laws & Policies

Congress established Herbert Hoover National Historic Site in 1965 to:

"...preserve in public ownership historically significant properties associated with the life of Herbert Hoover."

Public Law 89-119 (79 Stat. 510)

 

Rules and regulations

A selection of park rules and regulations is below. The complete rules and regulations of Herbert Hoover National Historic Site are contained in two documents:

  1. Federal regulations covering all National Park Service lands are contained in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 36, Chapter 1.
  2. Regulations pertaining specifically to Herbert Hoover National Historic Site are contained in the Superintendent's Compendium (PDF file).

Download a map illustrating the 500 foot diameter circle around the Gravesite of President and Mrs. Hoover where certain activities are restricted »

Violators are brought before the U.S. District Courts in Cedar Rapids, Iowa and are punishable by fine and/or imprisonment.

Collecting

Taking quantities of leaves, nuts, berries, apples and rhubarb for personal use only is permitted.

No other natural, cultural, or archeological resources or features may be disturbed or removed from the park. Relic hunting is prohibited. Possession of a metal detector in the park is unlawful.

Commercial Photography and Filming

All commercial photographers must get a special use permit before working in the park.

Firearms and Other Weapons

Legislation: As of February 22, 2010 federal law allows people who can legally possess firearms under applicable federal, state, and local laws to legally possess firearms in this park. Refer to Section 512 of the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009, Public Law 111-24, 123 Stat. 1764-65.

Park User Responsibility: It is the responsibility of visitors to understand and comply with all applicable state, local, and federal firearm laws before entering this park. As a starting point, please see the Iowa Code, Chapter 724.

Weapons Prohibited in Federal Facilities: Federal law also prohibits firearms in certain facilities in this park; those places are marked with signs at all public entrances. Refer to 18 U.S.C. § 930.

Lost and Found

Property may not be left unattended longer than 24 hours. Found property must be turned in to the Visitor Center or nearest park ranger.

Pets

Pets are allowed in the park, but must be physically restrained at all times. Leashes may not exceed six feet in length. Pets, except service animals, are prohibited in buildings and may not be tied to objects and left unattended.

Pet excrement must be immediately collected by the pet handler and removed from the site or deposited in an appropriate waste container.

Permits

Certain activities, like commercial photography, weddings, or special events require a permit.

Recreational Activites

Activities prohibited in the historic core, loop road, and Gravesite areas include, but are not limited to, kite-flying, ball-playing, Frisbee-throwing, sledding, tobogganing, tubing, etc.

Motor vehicles and bicycles must remain on established paved roads and parking areas. Bicycles are prohibited from all park trails and sidewalks.

Picnicking is allowed only at the park picnic shelters and on the Village Green.

Loud playing of radios, tape recorders, musical instruments, CD players, or other audio devices is prohibited. This also includes loud motor vehicles, motorized toys, generators, and other noise-making devices.

Roller skates, in-line skates, roller skis, skateboards, coasting vehicles, and similar devices are prohibited.

Smoking

Smoking is prohibited in all park buildings and within the tallgrass prairie.

Trash and Littering

Littering or other dumping of refuse is prohibited. Use of park dumpsters for discarding household trash is prohibited.

Wildlife

Hunting, trapping, touching, feeding, teasing, or otherwise disturbing wildlife or fish is prohibited.

 

Did You Know?

Yellow coneflowers in the lush green prairie grass.

General Land Office surveyors who first came to Iowa commented that the territory was fit only for waterfowl. Eighty-five percent of Iowa used to be soggy tallgrass prairie. More...