• Mt Reynolds

    Glacier

    National Park Montana

Paving Begins Between Avalanche and Logan Creeks

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Date: August 8, 2013
Contact: Denise Germann, 406 888 5838

Paving will begin the week of August 12 on the Going-to-the-Sun Road between Avalanche Creek and Logan Creek, on the west side of the park. Visitors can expect delays of 20 minutes in this area during this time, which is anticipated to take approximately one week, weather dependent. A pilot vehicle will be used to provide traffic control.

Visitors visiting the Trail of the Cedars or hiking the Avalanche Trail to Avalanche Lake may encounter a busy and congested area for parking.

Rehabilitation work on the Going-to-the-Sun Road also continues on the east side of the park, between Rising Sun and Siyeh Bend and visitors can expect a 20 minute maximum day-time delay. Rehabilitation crews are working 24 hours a day, Monday through early Friday morning in this area. Public access is limited after 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday nights between Rising Sun and Siyeh Bend. Logan Pass is accessible from the West Entrance of the Going-to-the-Sun Road during this time.

Sun Point, located on the east side, is closed to the public and being utilized as a staging area for rehabilitation activities. The Sun Point picnic area and restroom facilities are not available, and the park shuttle does not stop at this location. It is anticipated that Sun Point will remain closed to the public for the next few years, or through rehabilitation work.

For more information about the rehabilitation project visit http://www.wfl.fhwa.dot.gov/projects/mt/gtsr/ or contact the park at 406-888-7800.

The visitor shuttle system traveling the Going-to-the-Sun Road will operate through Labor Day. Transit centers are located near Apgar on the west-side of the park and the St. Mary Visitor Center on the east-side. For more information about the shuttle system please visit http://www.nps.gov/glac/planyourvisit/shuttles.htm.

Did You Know?

Lake McDonald

Lake McDonald is the largest lake in the park with a length of 10 miles and a depth of 472 feet. The glacier that carved the Lake McDonald valley is estimated to have been around 2,200 feet thick.