• Mt Reynolds

    Glacier

    National Park Montana

Public Invited to View Film About Dark Skies

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Date: August 20, 2012
Contact: Denise Germann, 406-888-5838
Contact: Jennifer Lutman, 406-888-7895

WEST GLACIER, MT. - The Crown of the Continent Research Learning Center at Glacier National Park is hosting a free brown-bag seminar on Thursday, August 23 from 12- 1:30 p.m. at the Community Building in West Glacier. The public is invited to view "The City Dark," an 84-minute documentary film chronicling the disappearance of dark skies. Join David Ingram, Chapter Leader for Dark Skies Northwest, representing the International Dark-Sky Association for an introduction to the film and information about light pollution.

Since its premiere in March 2011, "The City Dark" has been shown at 40 film festivals, winning 9, and seen in over 200 community gatherings. The film blends a humorous, searching tone with poetic footage of the night sky, and is an introduction to the science of dark. The documentary film is also shown every Tuesday and Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. at the St. Mary Visitor Center.

This film screening is part of Glacier National Park's summer astronomy program efforts, providing interpretive night sky and solar activity viewing opportunities for the public. Throughout the park dedicated volunteer astronomers provide laser-guided constellation tours and telescope viewing of deep space objects like galaxies, star clusters, planets, and nebulae. The park's astronomy program is supported by The Glacier National Park Fund and Glacier Association.

Glacier National Park is home to some of the darkest skies in the world, providing ideal conditions for viewing opportunities while maintaining critical wildlife and plant habitat for species affected by artificial light. A joint effort between Waterton Lakes National Park in Canada and Glacier National Park is being initiated for designation of both parks as an International Dark Sky Park/Preserve so all may experience this vanishing resource.

For more information about the film presentation, or the Crown of the Continent Research Learning Center, please visit http://www.nps.gov/glac/naturescience/ccrlc.htm or call 406-888-5827. For information on the International Dark-Sky Association visit www.darksky.org and for information about the park's astronomy program and the ranger-led activities schedule, contact the park at 406-888-7800 or visit http://home.nps.gov/applications/glac/inforequest/inforequest3.cfm.

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Lake McDonald

Lake McDonald is the largest lake in the park with a length of 10 miles and a depth of 472 feet. The glacier that carved the Lake McDonald valley is estimated to have been around 2,200 feet thick.