• Currier & Ives lithograph depicting the bombardment of Fort Sumter

    Fort Sumter

    National Monument South Carolina

There are park alerts in effect.
hide Alerts »
  • No Elevator Service at Fort Sumter

    The museum, restrooms, bookstore, and top level of Fort Sumter are only accessible by climbing stairs. For more information, visit the link below or please call (843) 883-3123. More »

Slave Dwelling Project

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: April 28, 2011
Contact: Bill Martin, (843) 883-3123 x 11

Have you ever slept in a slave cabin? Joseph McGill can tell you what it’s like. Over the last year, he has stayed overnight in rural cabins and urban slave quarters throughout the southeast to raise public awareness for the need to preserve them. This impressive project has called attention to these endangered buildings and their historical significance to the American landscape.

“Some of my ancestors lived in buildings like these their entire lives,” said McGill, a program officer of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. “There aren’t many of these cabins left and those that remain are in need of protection before they’re lost forever. Our future generations need to be able to experience the places that are so deeply linked to the lives of so many African Americans.”

McGill will discuss his slave dwelling project at the Fort Moultrie Visitor Center at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, May 7 as part of the National Park Service’s efforts to commemorate the sesquicentennial of the Civil War. This free program chronicles his travels and experiences in five states.

Fort Moultrie is administered by Fort Sumter National Monument, a unit of the National Park Service. Located at 1214 Middle Street, Sullivan's Island, South Carolina, the fort and visitor center are open daily from 9:00-5:00 except for New Year's, Thanksgiving and Christmas Days. For more information, call (843) 883-3123.

Did You Know?

Artist's rendition of the opening shot of the American Civil War with Fort Sumter in the distance.

The first shot of the American Civil War didn't hit anything. It was a 10-inch mortar shell, fired from Fort Johnson, that exploded above Fort Sumter as a signal for Confederate artillery to open fire on the Union-held fort. Fort Sumter National Monument, SC