• Currier & Ives lithograph depicting the bombardment of Fort Sumter

    Fort Sumter

    National Monument South Carolina

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  • Accessibility Ramp at Fort Sumter Out of Service Friday, July 11

    The ramp will be out of service for maintenance starting the morning of Friday, July 11 for maintenance until at least 12:00 PM. Visitors with wheelchairs should plan on taking a later boat. For the latest information, call (843) 883-3123.

  • No Elevator Serivce at Fort Sumter

    Only the original parade ground level of Fort Sumter is accessible. Accommodations are made for disabled visitors traveling to Fort Sumter from Liberty Square. For more information, visit the link below or please call (843) 883-3123. More »

Lighthouse Open House May 2010

Black & white three-sided lighthouse.
Carlin Timmons

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News Release Date: April 22, 2010

Join the National Park Service for an open house on Saturday, May 1, 2010. The event takes place from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. on the grounds of the U.S. Coast Guard Historic District at 1815 I’On Avenue on Sullivan’s Island.

The Historic District represents the evolution of events important in United States maritime history from 1895 to 1962. Commissioned in 1962 as the last major lighthouse to be built in the United States, the Sullivan’s Island Lighthouse replaced the Morris Island Lighthouse, which was built in 1876.

The grounds, quarters cupola and boat house will be open to the public from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. Because of safety concerns, only the lower section of the lighthouse will be open to the public. Authors Margie Willis Clary and Kim McDermott will sign copies of their book, South Carolina Lighthouses. The Arcadia book will be available for purchase. All activities are free and open to the public. For more information, call the park at (843) 883-3123.

Did You Know?

Fort Sumter as seen from the water.

Fort Sumter's island was constructed with a foundation of over 70,000 tons of granite and other rock. For over a decade contractors from as far away as New York and the Boston area delivered this material by ship and dumped it on a shoal in Charleston Harbor. Fort Sumter National Monument, SC