• large wooden spikes jut out from a large wooden angular wall lit by sunlight. verdant grass surrounds it.

    Fort Stanwix

    National Monument New York

A Mammoth Day with Fort Stanwix National Monument’s Backyard Rangers

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Date: September 17, 2012
Contact: Susan Jones, 315-338-7730

A black trimmed poster of an illustrated wooly mammoth
National Park Service

On October 20th, the Fort Stanwix Backyard Rangers celebrate National Fossil Day in a mammoth way! This year's theme is ancient mammoths of all sizes. Join local paleontologist Ray Vodden as he shares his latest research specimen, a cast of a pygmy mammoth skull.
 
In May of 2010, seven-year-old Kylie Ferguson participated in a Junior Paleontologist program at Badlands National Park, South Dakota. Kylie discovered a rare museum quality saber tooth cat skull. A casting of that cat will be on display at Fort Stanwix along with the rest of Kylie's story.

Explore the world of paleontology through the Junior Paleontologist program with Park Ranger Susan Jones in activities that allow you to discover the fun of fossils in your backyard. Ranger Susan will present "The Beecher's Trilobite Bed", a look at the unique fossil history of the Fort Stanwix area. Make a fossil rubbing of a Giant Trilobite to add to your collection.

To ensure staffing and supply needs are met for the event, reservations are requested. To make a reservation, please call the park's main number, 315-338-7730 and speak with the staff on duty. The next Backyard Ranger Day will be held November 17, 2012, featuring visiting endangered species with Syracuse Zoo.

Fort Stanwix National Monument is open seven days a week from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm. Admission to the park is free. Activities are ongoing unless noted. For more information about upcoming events please call the park at (315) 338-7730. Please visit the park's web page at www.nps.gov/fost for additional information about the park and up-to-date news about park events.                                                                                                                                                                                NPS -

Did You Know?

A brown grey map, a dotted red line curves and connects two solid blue ones. A black star sits at the center.

In the 18th century it was possible to travel to the interior of North America almost entirely by water. Fort Stanwix was built to protect the largest break in this chain, the Oneida Carrying Place. This was a 1-6 mile long portage area situated between the Mohawk River and Wood Creek in New York. More...