• Historic inscriptions carved in the bluff at El Morro.

    El Morro

    National Monument New Mexico

Laws & Policies

Firearm Regulations





Beginning February 22, 2010, a new federal law allows people who can legally possess firearms under applicable federal, state, and local laws, to legally possess firearms in this monument. The Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009, was enacted May 22, 2009 and will become effective February 22, 2010. Section 512 of this law; Protecting Americans from Violent Crimes, supersedes the uniform treatment of firearm possession in the National Park System outside Alaska under the regulations found at 36 C.F.R. 2.4.





It is the responsibility of visitors to understand and comply with all applicable state, local, and federal firearms laws before entering this monument. Firearms may not be discharged in this national monument and hunting is prohibited at all times.





Federal law also prohibits firearms in certain facilities in this park (such as visitor centers, government offices, etc). These places are marked with signs at all public entrances.





For more information of New Mexico gun laws, please visit our state’s website:





State Home Page





State Statutes





Concealed Weapons Information





State Reciprocity





Attorney General



(505) 827-6000



P.O. Drawer 1508, Santa Fe, NM 87504-1508



Relevant Statutes:
(not inclusive)



New Mexico Statutes Annotated §§ 17-2-12; 17-2-33 through 35; 29-19-1 through 12; 30-3-8; 30-7-1 through 16; 32A-2-33.

 

El Morro 2010 Compendium



Click here to download the 2010 El Morro Compendium!

Did You Know?

Image of tinaja on mesa top at El Morro National Monument

It is likely the early inhabitants of Atsinna Pueblo at El Morro National Monument collected water when they could from the many tinajas found across the top of the mesa. These natural depressions in the sandstone hold rain during the summer monsoons and snowmelt during the winter.