• Photo of the Eisenhower Farm. Courtesy of Stan Cohen.

    Eisenhower

    National Historic Site Pennsylvania

Frequently Asked Questions

Why can’t you drive out to the Farm?
Currently, there is no parking available on site. Access to the site is available via shuttle buses that leave from the Visitor Center throughout the day.

Is the Eisenhower farm wheelchair accessible?
The Eisenhower shuttle bus, the first floor of the Eisenhower home, the grounds, and the Reception Center are all wheelchair accessible. Visitors using wheelchairs may arrange to follow the shuttle bus in their private vehicle and park in the site handicapped parking area by notifying the cashier at the Visitor Center ticket counter.

How much time should I plan to spend at the Farm?
Visitors typically spend from 11/2 to 2 hours at the site.

How big is the Farm?
The President’s Farm is 230 acres. However, the site today comprises four farms with a total of 690 acres.

Is the President’s farm still a working farm?
The farm is leased out to a local farmer with the stipulation that he grows the same crops the President grew; that he employs the President’s sound farm management practices: strip farming, rotation, and contour plowing; and that he grazes black Angus cattle just as the President did.

Where is Eisenhower buried?
In a chapel in Abilene, Kansas at the site of his boyhood home and Presidential Library. Beside him are his wife, Mamie, and their first son Doud Dwight who died of scarlet fever at the age of three in 1921.

Where is the Eisenhower Presidential Library?
In Abilene, Kansas at the site of his boyhood home.

Did You Know?

Ike and Nixon at 52 Convention

Dwight D. Eisenhower conducted the last of the great whistle stop campaigns, logging over 51,000 miles aboard the Eisenhower Special during the presidential campaign of 1952. In that same year, he became the first presidential nominee to launch a television campaign.