• De Soto Landing

    De Soto

    National Memorial Florida

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Directions

De Soto National Memorial is easily accessible by plane, automobile, and boat.

Plane Two major airports are located with a 50 minute drive of the park:

  • Sarasota-Bradenton Airport (20 miles)


  • Tampa International Airport (50 miles)



Car


De Soto National Memorial's Street Address:
8300 De Soto Memorial Hwy
Bradenton, Florida 34209

Driving Directions:
From I-75 Take exit 220 SR 64/Manatee Ave, Gulf Beaches exit. Travel west on SR 64 for approximately 12 miles to 75th St. W. Turn right onto 75th St. W. travel north approximately 2 miles to the northern terminus 75th St. W. turns into De Soto Memorial Hwy and dead ends into the park.

From I-275 exit 5, follow US-19 into Bradenton. Turn west onto State Road 64, and proceed approximately five miles to 75th Street West. Turn right (north) onto 75th Street West, and proceed two and one half mile to the park entrance and the terminus of 75th Street/ De Soto Memorial Highway.

From Cortez Ave travel west to 75th St. W. turn right. Travel north on 75th St. W. approximately 4 miles to northern terminus. 75th St. W. turns into De Soto Memorial Hwy and will dead end into




Public Transportation

Manatee County Area Transit (MCAT) serves the area, however, no bus routes currently stop at the Memorial. For more information about MCAT see the link below.





Boat

Boaters may access the park via the Manatee River. A small cove east (up river) of De Soto Point offers a temporary anchorage sheltered from south winds. Small craft may be beached at the cove, but boaters may not tie to protected vegetation including mangroves nor to park equipment including signs and benches.

De Soto National Memorial does not have a boat ramp.















Did You Know?

Did You Know?

Gumbo Limbo trees like this one at De Soto National Memorial in Bradenton, Florida, are called tourist trees because they stand in the sun, turn red, and peel. More...