• pond surrounded by green brush, reflecting a distant range of snow-covered mountains that are dominated by one massive mountain

    Denali

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • Road Open To: Mile 3 (Park Headquarters)

    The Park Road is currently open to Mile 3, Park Headquarters. Wintry conditions beyond that point prevent vehicle travel, though pedestrian travel is permitted. More »

GIS and GPS Data

GIS

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) manage spatial data for display in map form. This technology is becoming increasingly accessible to the general public through applications such as Google Earth, World Wind, etc. These applications read files in KML or KMZ format and display the information overlaying their base display. Here, we have listed a number of layers in KML format for download. The files display various features of interest in the Denali area.

Download Instructions:
To download these files click on the link. You will be presented with the choice to either open the file with a specified program or save the file to your disk. Selecting the first choice will open the program, such as Google Earth, and then display the feature.


Note: A more complete list of GIS data for more complex analysis is available from the NPS at the Natural Resource Information Portal.

GPS

GPS technology that uses signals from orbiting satellites to determine one's location on the ground has exploded in popularity and is increasingly being used in personal equipment including handheld GPS, Cars, and cell phones. Provided here are coordinates for the boundary of Denali National Park and Preserve, including the park wilderness.

Note: all locations are approximate and the accuracy of positions depends in part on the GPS equipment used and observation conditions.

Park Boundary Information

Did You Know?

scenic image of a green plain bisected by a thin river, mountains and clouds in the distance

Cold temperatures limit trees from growing at high elevation in Denali. Warmer temperatures, however, have led to woody vegetation growing at ever-higher elevations. Treeline changes are a conspicuous sign of climate change.