• pond surrounded by green brush, reflecting a distant range of snow-covered mountains that are dominated by one massive mountain

    Denali

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

NPS Seeking Public Input for Centennial

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Date: March 16, 2007
Contact: Superintendent's Office, 907-683-9581

The National Park Service (NPS) will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2016. As a part of the process to strengthen and prepare parks for another century of conservation, preservation and public enjoyment, the NPS is hosting listening sessions across the United States to hear from those with an interest in parks and NPS programs.

Denali National Park and Preserve will host a listening session on Monday, March 19 from 7–9 p.m. at the Murie Science and Learning Center, located at Mile 1.3 on the Denali Park Road. Other state sessions are taking place in Anchorage, Fairbanks, Sitka, and the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park headquarters.

Participants will be asked to consider questions such as these:

· Think of your children and grandchildren enjoying national parks in 2016 and beyond. How do you hope it will be? What are your concerns?

· Think of your visits to national parks – what are your favorite memories?

· What role do you think national parks should play in the lives of Americans and for visitors from around the world?

· What are the projects and programs that you think should be highlighted for completion over the next 10 years?

If you are not able to attend, suggestions may be shared on-line by using the Centennial link at www.nps.gov/2016 or by writing to:

National Park Service
Office of the Centennial Coordinator
P.O. Box 25287
Denver, CO 80225

Comments must be received by April 2, 2007.

For questions or additional information about the listening session, please call the Superintendent’s Office at (907) 683-9581.

Did You Know?

scenic view from a mountainside, overlooking a wide gravel plain and distant mountains

Small amounts of airborne pollutants from around the world arrive in Denali every year. Remoteness alone cannot protect the park's clean air. As global human population grows, it is likely that increasing global emissions will affect Denali's air quality.