• pond surrounded by green brush, reflecting a distant range of snow-covered mountains that are dominated by one massive mountain

    Denali

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

Denali Fires Slowed by Cooler Weather

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Date: June 28, 2013
Contact: Kris Fister, (907) 683-9583

DENALI PARK, Alaska: No new fires have been detected in Denali National Park and Preserve in the past 24 hours, and fire activity has slowed due to the cool, moist weather the area is experiencing.

The three small fires detected in remote backcountry areas north of the Denali Park Road after the Wednesday lightning storm have shown minimal activity. The Wigand Fire is currently 2.5 miles northeast of the Lower Toklat ranger patrol cabin. Fire personnel will provide structure protection if fire activity threatens the cabin. The Sandless Lake Fire near the northern park boundary, and the Bear Creek Fire approximately 15 miles northwest of Kantishna, are not threatening any sensitive park resources. All of these fires will continue to be monitored for any changes in activity.

The National Park Service fire crew will assess the Brooker Mountain and Xerxes wildfires, located in Kantishna and by Wonder Lake, today for any remaining hot spots. When there is no fire activity detected the fires will be declared out.

The Moving River Fire located approximately 30 miles northwest of Kantishna is now at 19,000 acres. BLM and USFS smokejumpers have finished mop-up around the historic Roosevelt cabin site, and will be demobilized so that they are available for another assignment. This fire is being managed by the Type 3 interagency incident management team based at Lake Minchumina.

The Beaver Log Lakes Fire is also being managed by the Type 3 interagency incident management team.The fire has increased to 42,354 acres (most acreage outside of Denali National Preserve). Fire personnel are assessing structures and initiating structure protection for buildings around Lake Minchumina.

In spite of cooler conditions, fire danger for the park and surrounding area remains high to extreme. The National Park Service is urging park visitors to be extremely cautious with anything that could start a wildfire. Campfires are being discouraged, but they are permitted in the fire grates in some of the park's campgrounds.Fires are not allowed in the park's wilderness areas. Everyone has a hand in a safe wildfire season.

Fireworks are not allowed in the park and will be confiscated. Persons using fireworks in the park may be prosecuted.

There are currently 118 active wildfires in the state. Where there is fire, there is smoke. Smoke from numerous fires burning statewide is impacting areas throughout the state, including Denali National Park and Preserve. Park visitors should anticipate the possibility of varying levels of smoke produced by fires far from the park. Keep informed of local fire information and air quality reports. Wildfire smoke information is available at http://dec.alaska.gov/air/smokemain.htm. Visit http://fire.ak.blm.gov for statewide fire information and a map of the active fires.

This will be the last daily press release on Denali fires until fire activity changes significantly. Visit http://www.nps.gov/dena/parkmgmt/currentfireinfo.htm for current information about wildfires in Denali National Park and Preserve.

www.nps.gov

Did You Know?

scenic image of a green plain bisected by a thin river, mountains and clouds in the distance

Cold temperatures limit trees from growing at high elevation in Denali. Warmer temperatures, however, have led to woody vegetation growing at ever-higher elevations. Treeline changes are a conspicuous sign of climate change.