• 18th century tents are set up in a lane.

    Cowpens

    National Battlefield South Carolina

Native Plants

Dwarf flower heartleaf

Dwarf flower heartleaf

Cowpens National Battlefield is home to a federally listed threatened plant, Hexastylis naniflora (Dwarf flower heartleaf), which is endemic to the southern outer piedmont, as well as two "state concern" species. In addition to rare plants, the park offers a diverse variety of native flora.

 
Giant Cane1

Giant Cane

On a walk around the battlefield, visitors can see one of the most historically important species, Arundinaria gigantea (Giant cane). Giant cane was formerly found in even greater quantities at the time of the battle of Cowpens, was one of the main sources of cattle forage in the area, and helped determine the boundaries of the battle.

 
Eastern Red Cedar

Eastern Red Cedar

When hiking on the nature trail take a moment to observe the Lycopodium digitatum (fan clubmoss) that grows on the forest floor, as well as the upper canopy for a view of Platanus occidentalis (Sycamore). In the winter, look for evergreen species like Ilex opaca (Holly), Juniperus virginiana (Eastern red-cedar), and Chimaphila maculata (Striped prince's pine).

 
Black Oak on the left and White Oak on the right

Black Oak and White Oak

Twelve species of Quercus (Oak) can be found within the park. Note the many differences between their lobed leaves as you walk the battlefield loop or the nature trails.

Did You Know?

climax of the Battle of Cowpens

The Battle of Cowpens, fought by the Americans and British on January 17, 1781, lasted less than an hour.