• Scenic View from Inspiration Point, Anacapa Island ©timhaufphotography.com

    Channel Islands

    National Park California

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Channel Islands Live: How It Works

NPS
 

Technology Transports People to a Hidden World
Channel Islands Live programs are transmitted via microwave frequency from Anacapa Island and Santa Cruz Island across 18 miles of open ocean to the Red Mountain tower in Ventura, part of Ventura County Office of Education’s wireless network. The signal is instantly repeated to a receiver at the Channel Islands National Park Robert J. Lagomarsino Visitor Center in Ventura, where audiences experience the program in real time.

For the 250,000 people who visit the Ventura visitor center annually, these virtual hikes, talks, and dives offer unique opportunities to connect to the rugged beauty and remarkable resources of the islands. Programs are also transmitted to participating schools and broadcast live into students can ask questions as they explore the Channel Islands.

Using wireless technology, the Live Dive, offer views into a hidden world. Without ever getting wet, students and visitors can take an “underwater hike” through the Channel Islands kelp forest guided by a park ranger. Fitted with a special SCUBA face mask, an underwater ranger communicates with the live audience and answers questions about the marine ecosystem.

The Live Hike offers students and visitors the opportunity to take an interactive virtual hike on Anacapa Island with park rangers, researchers and scientists to learn about ongoing restoration projects, along with the natural and cultural history of the island without ever crossing the channel.

The Channel Islands Live EagleCAM transmits similarly from Santa Cruz Island to the Red Mountain tower. Other webcams coming soon will bring views of various island features including the landing cove, and underwater in the kelp forest.

Did You Know?

1994 pygmy mammoth excavation, Santa Rosa Island

The world's most complete pygmy mammoth specimen was discovered on Santa Rosa Island in 1994. These miniature mammoths, only four to six feet tall, once roamed island grasslands and forests during the Pleistocene.