A River and Its People

The Cane River region is home to a unique culture; the Creoles. The nearly three hundred year relationship between the Cane River Creoles and their homeland was shaped by the river. This relationship was tested by flood, drought, war, and numerous other obstacles. Luckily, their resilience and resourcefulness has allowed the Creole culture to endure and thrive.

Features

Oakland Plantation Bottle Garden, home of the Prud'homme family for over 200 years

What Does it Mean to be Creole?

In colonial Louisiana the term “Creole” was used to indicate New World products derived from Old World stock, and could apply to people, architecture.

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Enslaved brick cabins at Magnolia.

African Mastery of a Strange Land

The skills and strengths of enslaved African-Americans are evident in the buildings they constructed on both Oakland and Magnolia Plantations.

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Oakland and Magnolia Plantation

Oakland and Magnolia Plantation

The Prud'homme family began Bermuda, later Oakland in 1785. Magnolia traces its 1854 origin to the LeComte and later the Hertzog family.

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Like to ride a bike and learn about history?

Bike Rides

Come discover the history of Cane River on a bicycle; rides are offered throughout the year and bikes and helmets are provided. Give us a call.

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Oakland Plantation Main House Bottle Garden

Oakland Plantation Main House Bottle Garden

French wine and other bottles dating to the 1800s border the flower beds at Oakland.

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Did You Know?