• Chunks of melting sea ice along a shoreline and subsistence camps on the beach in the background.

    Cape Krusenstern

    National Monument Alaska

Things To Do

Kayaking, fishing, camping, hiking, backpacking, wildlife watching, and photo opportunities abound in the summer. With winter arctic survival skills and personal equipment, snow machining, skiing and dog mushing are also possible. Community programs are available in the summer at the Northwest Arctic Heritage Center. Topics include natural and cultural history of the monument, local research, local crafts and children’s activities. Schedules vary, so please call 907-442-3890 before your arrival to learn about upcoming programs.

There are no developed facilities in Cape Krusenstern National Monument. Access in summer is by plane or boat. Winter access is by plane or snow machine. Summer hikes are possible along the many miles of beach. Private land lines much of the coast, so please detour around areas that show any signs of ownership. A hike in the hills provides a spectacular view of tundra landforms, the Chukchi Sea, and possibly muskoxen. Be prepared for the spongy tundra to slow your hiking speed. Kayaking is also possible on several large lagoons. Remember to pack warm clothing, as prevailing westerly winds may drop wind chill factors below freezing, even in summer.

Small planes may be chartered from Kotzebue to land in the national monument, or to fly over the area for a view of the beach ridges and wildlife.

Did You Know?

Image of bearded seal

Bearded seals (Ugruk), the largest of western arctic seals, weigh up to 800 pounds. They appear in June in the waters adjacent to the monument. Despite its short seasonal presence, the light grey bearded seal is a highly important subsistence resource.