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Karst Hoogeboom selected as Chief of Facilities and Maintenance

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Date: March 24, 2009
Contact: George E. Price, Jr., Superintendent, 508-771-2144

Superintendent George E. Price, Jr. Price announced that Karst R. Hoogeboom has been selected as the Chief of Facilities & Maintenance for Cape Cod National Seashore. Mr. Hoogeboom has extensive experience in planning, design, construction, and operation of major facilities, especially with Massachusetts State Parks.  His most recent experience was as Deputy Commissioner for Planning and Engineering for the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR), the 6th largest state park system in the country.  As the Facility Manager and Chief of Maintenance, Hoogeboom will be responsible for the maintenance of facilities within the 44,000 acre seashore including 300 structures, two visitors centers, 17 miles of roads and trails, support for the six guarded beaches and coordination with the six towns on mutual responsibilities. 

Price said, “We are very lucky to have Karst join our management team.  He has a tremendous amount of experience with parks and park facilities with significant tourism impact, regional planning, design skills, as well as sensitivity toward natural resource management.  He will be able to build upon the success of the Seashore Maintenance Division including sustainable practices, green operations and the alternate transportation systems such as the FLEX busses obtained through National Park Service resources.  Karst also has a great background to work with the six towns on issues of mutual concern.  We are glad he is on board.”

Hoogeboom began his career with a small landscape architectural firm in upstate New York specializing in park design and development.  As he has moved up the ladder, he has frequently collaborated with managers and staff at numerous national parks, both in Massachusetts and along the east coast of the U.S.  He has over 25 years of park experience and has worked extensively on some of the most historic and environmentally sensitive landscapes in Massachusetts.   

He states he is very excited and privileged to have the opportunity to work at Cape Cod National Seashore; with such an inspirational and dedicated staff, some of the most spectacular natural, cultural and recreational resources in the country, and a facility that is a model of collaboration between park and community.

Hoogeboom fills the position vacated by Ben Pearson who retired in September.  He was selected in a competitive process that included applicants from throughout the United States.  Hoogeboom graduated from Paul Smith’s College and has dual degrees from Syracuse University and the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, where he majored in Landscape Architecture, Planning and Environmental Studies.

Karst, his wife, and three sons live in Cumberland, Rhode Island.  He serves on several statewide boards and commissions, has been recognized by his peers and the community with numerous awards on a national and state level, and lectures occasionally on landscape preservation and protection issues.  He has made Cape Cod his second home, having spent extensive amounts of time on the Cape since childhood, more so after his parents moved to Eastham in 1973. 

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Did You Know?

Cape Cod

In the mid-19th century, Henry David Thoreau walked the Atlantic coastline of Cape Cod, recording his adventures in his narrative "Cape Cod". To literally follow in Thoreau’s footsteps today would require scuba gear. Cape Cod’s Outer Beach sees an average erosion rate of close to 4 feet per year.