• Bryce Canyon Amphitheater

    Bryce Canyon

    National Park Utah

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  • U.S. Highway 89 Bryce Canyon to Grand Canyon

    Road damage south of Page, Arizona will impact travel between Bryce Canyon and Grand Canyon National Parks. Click for a travel advisory and link to a map with suggested alternate routes: More »

  • Sunset Campground Construction

    From April-July 2014, three new restroom facilities will be constructed in Sunset Campground. Visitors may experience construction noise and dust, as well as some campsite and restroom closures. 'Sunset Campground' webpage has additional information. More »

  • Bryce Point to Peekaboo Connector Trail Closure

    Due to a large rockslide, the connecting trail from Bryce Point to Peekaboo Loop is closed. Trail will be reopened once repairs are made. The Peekaboo Loop is open, but must be accessed from Sunset or Sunrise Point.

  • Wall Street Section of Navajo Loop Closed

    Due to dangerous conditions (falling rock and treacherous, icy switchbacks), the Wall Street section of the Navajo Loop Trail is CLOSED. It will reopen in Spring once freezing temperatures have subsided.

  • Backcountry Campsite Closures

    Due to bear activity at select campsites in Bryce Canyon's backcountry, two backcountry campsites have been closed until further notice: Sheep Creek and Iron Spring.

Sunset Campground

Campsite in Sunset Campground, with trees, grass, picnic table and fire grate.

Typical campsite with fire grate, picnic table and parking in Sunset Campground

NPS

From April through July of 2014, Sunset Campground will be undergoing a major renovation. Construction of three new restrooms will result in site closures, restroom facility closures, and significant construction traffic. The Group Campsite will be closed during this process. An alternative Group Site with portable toilets will be established. Group Site reservations will be relocated to this alternative site. Construction will be limited to the hours of 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Visitors can expect noisy, dusty conditions during these hours. We apologize for the inconvenience, and appreciate your patience as we upgrade your national park facilities.

(Campground is closed in winter.)

Sunset Campground is located west of Sunset Point, approximately 1.5 miles south of the Bryce Canyon Visitor Center, and is comprised of 100 sites in 3 loops; A, B, & C.

20 Tent Sites are reservable during certain times of the year in Loop B (see Reservation Dates below). Cost is $15 per site/per night.

Loop A is for RV campers. Loops B & C are for tent campers.

There are two wheelchair-accessible sites located in Loop A, one of which is reservable during the reservation season. To reserve that site, you must contact the park directly. You may send your request to: Bryce Canyon National Park, PO Box 640201, Bryce, UT 84764, Attention: Campground Supervisor. Or, you may leave a message on the Campground phone: 435-834-4765. Be sure to include your name, contact information (phone # and/or email address) and the dates you wish to reserve.

This campground is closest to the best hiking trails which begin and end at Sunset Point.

RV and trailer combinations over 45 feet are discouraged, but not prohibited.

There are no sewer, water or electrical hook-ups available. A dump station is available in summer months near North Campground for a $5 use fee. Potable water is available near the dump station.

Reservation Dates:

  • 2012 - May 4 - September 23
  • 2013 - May 10 - September 22
  • 2014 - May 9 - September 21
  • 2015 - May 8 - September 27
  • 2016 - May 6 - September 25

To make reservations for 20 Tent Sites call (877) 444-6777 or click www.recreation.gov. Reservations for these sites can be made from 6 months to 2 days in advance (minimum advance reservation is two days).

All other sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis.

NOTE: Click here for a map of the campgrounds.

Did You Know?

Hoodoos stand as sentinels with their magic

The geologic term, hoodoo, lives on at Bryce Canyon National Park as perpetuated by early geologists who thought the rock formations could cast a spell on you with their magical spires and towering arches. More...