• Bryce Canyon Amphitheater

    Bryce Canyon

    National Park Utah

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  • U.S. Highway 89 Bryce Canyon to Grand Canyon

    Road damage south of Page, Arizona will impact travel between Bryce Canyon and Grand Canyon National Parks. Click for a travel advisory and link to a map with suggested alternate routes: More »

  • Sunset Campground Construction

    From April-July 2014, three new restroom facilities will be constructed in Sunset Campground. Visitors may experience construction noise and dust, as well as some campsite and restroom closures. 'Sunset Campground' webpage has additional information. More »

  • Bryce Point to Peekaboo Connector Trail Closure

    Due to a large rockslide, the connecting trail from Bryce Point to Peekaboo Loop is closed. Trail will be reopened once repairs are made. The Peekaboo Loop is open, but must be accessed from Sunset or Sunrise Point.

  • Wall Street Section of Navajo Loop Closed

    Due to dangerous conditions (falling rock and treacherous, icy switchbacks), the Wall Street section of the Navajo Loop Trail is CLOSED. It will reopen in Spring once freezing temperatures have subsided.

  • Backcountry Campsite Closures

    Due to bear activity at select campsites in Bryce Canyon's backcountry, two backcountry campsites have been closed until further notice: Sheep Creek and Iron Spring.

Park Planning

Bryce Canyon National Park has several documents to assist in informing the public about past, current and upcoming projects. These and other documents are located below to allow you, the visitor, a chance to view and/or comment on these projects.

 

Current Projects:

Shuttle Bus Shelters:
The park is currently constructing two new shuttle bus shelters within the park. One shelter is on the main road across from the Visitor Center. The second shelter will be in the northbound lane near the Sunset Campground entrance. Both shuttle stops will help support the park's transportation system and moving visitors around the park more efficiently. The shuttle stops will be available for use by visitors during the summer of 2012. If you would like more information on the status of this project, please contact the Park by e-mail.

Sewer line Rehabilitation Project:
The proposed project to repair several miles of the park's failing sewer system will begin during the fall of 2011. The park's existing sewage collection system includes deteriorating portions originally built in 1958 of clay pipe. These sections of the system and associated manholes are deteriorating into pieces and have caused extensive maintenance problems. The project will replace broken and deteriorating portions of the park's sewage collection system, demolish two small septic tank and leach-field systems and replace them with piped connections to the park's main sewage collection system, and recondition the sewage treatment lagoon cells. If you would like more information on the status of this project, please contact the Park by e-mail.

The park is in the early stages of developing two management plans:

Utah Prairie Dog Stewardship Plan
The National Park Service (NPS) is preparing an Environmental Assessment (EA) and Biological Assessment (BA) for a Utah Prairie Dog Stewardship Plan. Utah prairie dogs (Cynomys parvidens) are a federally-threatened species listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and are protected under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Among the purposes of the proposed stewardship plan would be to: ″Maintain a sustainable population of Utah prairie dogs to foster their role as a keystone species in the environment.″ Identify ways to enhance prairie dog habitat within the park based on habitat suitability and connectivity with existing populations, while maintaining the diversity of native plant communities and facilitating park operations. ″Minimize/mitigate the effects of human activities in the park on Utah prairie dogs.″ Contribute to range-wide recovery and sustainability of Utah prairie dog populations. Once completed, this plan will be used to benefit the management of Utah prairie dogs, their habitat and associated operations within the park. The first step in developing the Plan is to solicit issues and topics from the public which should be considered in the Plan. "From those interested, we wish to find out what issues are important to ensure that they are included in the environmental analysis process," said Superintendent Bradybaugh. To follow the progress of this plan, please visit NPS Park Planning. You may also contact the Park by e-mail for more information.

Multi-Modal Transportation Plan:
The development of a Multi-Modal Transportation Plan will enable the park to plan for current and future park traffic patterns in an integrated context. Some visitors are being negatively impacted by their experience accessing the park when parking areas are full or transit is over capacity. This project will also help the park plan for and address the heavy congestion within the park and related usage of public transportation, private vehicles, tour buses, and bicycles. It is critical to the continued successful operation of the shuttle service and to identify future locations for inter-modal connections (parking to transit, trails to parking, etc.). The plan will also aid in working with and adjusting general traffic flows including shuttle service hours and days of operation. To follow the progress of this plan, please visit NPS Park Planning. You may also contact the Park by e-mail for more information.

 

Did You Know?

Bryce Canyon Lodge

The Bryce Canyon Lodge, constructed in multiple phases throughout the 1920s, is a National Landmark on the National Register of Historic Places. It is the last of the original lodges, designed by Gilbert Stanley Underwood and built by the Utah Parks Company, to survive within the Grand Circle. More...