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    Big Bend

    National Park Texas

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Dedication of Peregrine Falcon Statue at Big Bend National Park

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Date: February 3, 2008
Contact: David Elkowitz, 432 477-1108

Dedication of a life-sized, bronze peregrine falcon sculpture will be held February 15 starting at 5:00 PM at the Basin Visitor Center in Big Bend National Park. The visitor center is located in the Chisos Mountains which are in the center of the park.

Donated by the Friends of Big Bend National Park, the sculpture commemorates the success of efforts to protect peregrine falcons, once an endangered species, in Big Bend National Park. The Friends of Big Bend National Park have assisted in the funding of years of research and monitoring of the peregrine within the park. Information about the falcon and the work the park has done to help protect it will be located at the base of the statue.

The bronze falcon was created by Bob Coffee, renowned Texas artist and member of Big Bend Friends’ Board of Directors. Bob has raised tens of thousands of dollars for the Friends of Big Bend from the sales of his bronze sculpture series "The Animals of Big Bend."

The ceremony, which starts at 5:00 PM, will include a dedication of the statue, a short talk about the peregrine falcon by Chief of Interpretation David Elkowitz, and refreshments. Park visitors are invited to attend.

Park Superintendent William E. Wellman stated, "The Park is pleased to accept the donation of the peregrine falcon sculpture created by artist Bob Coffee. The statue’s donation culminates his years of dedicated effort and service to the Friends of Big Bend National Park."

Did You Know?

At the top of the Lost Mine Trail

Some people who take the Lost Mine trail in Big Bend National Park may be secretly looking for the lost mine, but most take the climb to enjoy the scenery, vegetation, and wildlife. The rocks are mostly lava, but a few dikes of igneous rock filling fissures are seen along the way. More...