• Sierra del Carmen

    Big Bend

    National Park Texas

Science and Resource Management

Researchers taking population samples of the Big Bend mosquito fish.
Researchers taking population samples of the Big Bend mosquito fish.
NPS/Big Bend National Park
 
"What a beautiful laboratory Big Bend was."
-Lon Garrison, park superintendent, 1952-55
 

Scientific research carried out in Big Bend and the other national parks benefits a wide range of people. The public benefits from the insights that provide a better understanding of the natural world. Park managers use research to make science-based decisions about managing park resources, and scientists use information to further their own research questions. Interest in conducting research at a park is a measure of the scientific significance of park resources, and with over 100 annual permits, Big Bend National Park’s research program is among the most active in the National Park System.

Did You Know?

Hikers cautiously approach the Ernst Tinaja

The largest tinaja found in Big Bend National park, Ernst Tinaja, is about 13-15 feet deep. The floor is covered with small boulders. In the history of the park, it has only been recorded dry once, from March to June of 2000.