• Cannon and Cornfield at Dawn

    Antietam

    National Battlefield Maryland

14th Connecticut Infantry Monument

Dedicated: October 8, 1894

Location: 260 feet North of Bloody Lane

Map Number: 49

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14th Connecticut Infantry Monument

14th Connecticut Infantry Monument

NPS Photo

The Fourteenth Connecticut Volunteer Infantry
2nd Brig. 3rd Div. 2nd A.C.

Advanced to this point in a charge about 9:30 A.M., September 17th, 1862, then fell back eighty-eight yards to a cornfield fence and held position heavily engaged nearly two hours; then was sent to the support of the first brigade of its division at the Roulette Lane two hours; then was sent to the extreme left of the first division of this Coprs to the support of Brooke's Brigade and at 5 P.M. was placed in support between the Brigades of Caldwell and Meagher of that Division, overlooking "Bloody Lane", holding position there until 10 A.M. of the 18th when relieved.

This monument stands on the line of companies B and G near the left of the Regiment. In this battle the Regiment lost 38 killed and mortally wounded, 88 wounded and 21 reported missing.

U.S.
Regiment mustered August 23, 1862 with 1015 men Recruits 697 men, total 1712

Battle record from Antietam to Appomattox
Engagments 34
Killed and mortally wounded 202
Died of disease 186
Wounded 549
Discharged for disability 319

Erected by the
State of Connecticut
1894

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

Union General John Gibbon who served at Antietam and fought in the infamous Cornfield had three brothers who served in the Confederate army.