• North HillSide Photomerge

    Andersonville

    National Historic Site Georgia

Grave Decoration Policy

The National Park Service is privileged to care for this very special place and is well aware of the confidence and trust that our veterans' families place in us. Please help us preserve the dignity and beauty of the cemetery by observing the following floral regulations.

Flags
Park staff and volunteers decorate the cemetery with small United States flags on Memorial Day. Flags may not be placed on graves at any other time.

Flowers
Fresh-cut flowers may be placed on graves at any time. Artificial arrangements are not allowed from April 15 through October 10. All flowers will be removed when they become faded or unsightly, at the discretion of cemetery staff.

Containers and Other Items
Plantings, statues, vigil lights or other decorations are not permitted at any time. All containers should be non-breakable. Temporary floral vases are available at two locations in the Cemetery. Permanent below-ground metal floral containers are not permitted. Flowers, containers, or other items may not be attached to the headstone.

Seasonal Decorations
Christmas wreaths and floral blankets no larger than 2 by 3 feet are permitted from December 1 to January 20. After this time seasonal decorations will be removed and discarded.

Floral Arrangements and Other Decorations
During the periods ten days before and ten days after Easter Sunday and Memorial Day, potted plants and wreaths are permitted. During colder months, from October 10 to April 15, artificial flowers and wreaths are permitted. Plantings, statues, vigil lights, or other decorations are not permitted at any time.

These policies are for the beautification of the National Cemetery and the safety of visitors and park personnel.

Did You Know?

Sign for Office of Missing Soldiers

In 1865, Clara Barton opened the "Office of Correspondence with the Friends of the Missing Men of the United States Army" in Washington, D.C. When this office closed two years later, she had helped identify the fate of 22,000 soldiers, including the 13,000 men buried at Andersonville.