• Image of four aviators at leisure, playing cribbage

    Aleutian World War II

    National Historic Area Alaska

Stories of the Aleutians

During World War II the remote Aleutian Islands, home to the Unangan (Aleut) people for over 8,000 years, became one of the fiercely contested battlegrounds of the Pacific.

This thousand-mile-long archipelago saw the first invasion of American soil since the War of 1812, a mass internment of American civilians, a 15-month air campaign, and one of the deadliest battles in the Pacific Theatre. The Aleutian World War II National Historic Area and Visitor Center in Dutch Harbor, Alaska, tell these compelling stories and preserve the historic Fort Schwatka on Mount Ballyhoo. You can also hear some of these stories in the words of those who lived or served in the theater.

Did You Know?

Photograph of Japanese pilots before the raid on Dutch Harbor, 6 June 1942

When the Japanese invaded the islands of Attu and Kiska in June, 1942, it was the first time that an enemy occupied American soil since the War of 1812.