Experience Yosemite from Home

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View of the back of a ranger with Yosemite Valley in background.

During this period of social distancing and sheltering at home due to the COVID-19 pandemic, you can still stay connected to Yosemite National Park while the park is closed. We continue to post to our social media platforms regularly and have other resources to help keep you connected to Yosemite from the comfort of your own home!

Watch Park Videos

 
Image of Virtual Junior Ranger badge with Half Dome as if viewed through a computer screen.

Become a Yosemite Virtual Junior Ranger from Home!

While the park is closed, we are offering a virtual junior ranger program that you can do at home! Learn about some of the cultural and natural wonders of Yosemite (and your own home area) and share your art and thoughts with us.

How do you earn your virtual junior ranger badge?

Download the junior ranger activity worksheets.

After completing your junior ranger activities, email photos/scans to yose_information@nps.gov. Make sure to include your full name and address in order to receive the badge.

If you don't have access to email, you may send finished work to:

ATTN: PIO
Yosemite National Park
P.O. Box 577
Yosemite, CA 95389

If you don't have access to a printer, fill out the activity sheets on the computer (English) [619 kb PDF] (Spanish) [641 kb PDF] and email them to us. Make sure to include photos of the drawing activities in your email to us!

We have a very limited number of virtual junior ranger badges to mail out and they will take 6-8 weeks to arrive in your mailbox. Feel free to color your own while you wait!

 

Stay Engaged Through Social Media

Yosemite is active on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and has a channel on YouTube.

Special Facebook Live programs and premieres!

  • Watch past episodes of our "Kids as Rangers" Program online.
  • Join park rangers for a "Behind the Scenes" look at different jobs and places around the park. Learn from wildlife biologists, museum curators, geologists, and trail workers about what it really means to work in Yosemite! Tune in to our Facebook page for these program announcements. Past episodes are preserved to watch anytime.

Check Things out in Real Time via our Webcams

Read Through our Park Blogs

Read current or past blog entries to learn more about cultural and natural history topics, lessons learned from our search and rescue team, winter conditions in the high country, and more.

 

Art Activities

 
Black bear drawing step-by-step with images
Click image to open as a PDF.

Draw with a Park Ranger: Black Bear

Do you love bears? Do you love to doodle? Follow along step-by-step as we draw this adorable Yosemite black bear! Bonus points if you color your drawing or add scenery. Black bears fascinate wildlife enthusiasts due to their unique biology and behaviors. Did you know that most of Yosemite's black bears, despite their name, are not black, but are brown in color.

 
Image showing all step by step instructions and line drawings for the frog.
Click image to open as a PDF.

Draw with a Park Ranger: California Red-Legged Frog

The California red-legged frog was absent from Yosemite for over half a century, until it was reintroduced to Yosemite in 2017. This awesome amphibian makes its home in streams and wetlands, now including areas of Yosemite Valley.

Follow along step-by-step to create a frog of your own!

 
Image of step-by-step instructions for drawing a pika
Click image to open as PDF.

Draw with a Park Ranger: Pika

The American pika looks like a little hamster, but it's actually a relative of the rabbit. These critters live at the highest elevations in Yosemite, where they work hard all summer to gather, dry, and store grass and flowers for the winter.

Follow along step-by-step to draw your own pika!

 
Step-by-step directions on how to draw a simple line drawing of a spotted owl.
Click image to open as a PDF.

Draw with a Park Ranger: Spotted Owl

The California spotted owl is one of three subspecies of spotted owl (and the only variety that lives here in Yosemite.) These special owls prefer to live in mature, old-growth forests, and their presence might serve as an indicator of a healthy forest ecosystem. Spotted owls hunt at night, gliding silently through the trees in search of small prey like rodents or bats.

Once you've drawn your spotted owl, learn more about these special birds and the challenges they face here in the park from our friends at Yosemite Conservancy.

 
Image of step-by-step instructions for drawing a Steller's jay
Click image to open as PDF.

Draw with a Park Ranger: Steller's Jay

These raucous rockstars can be found just about anywhere in Yosemite, and with their cool hairdo, bright blue outfit, and loud, scratchy calls, they're hard to miss! Though they're far from rare, these little corvids (highly intelligent relatives of the blue jay, raven, and magpie) are pretty cool!

Follow along step-by-step as we draw a Steller's jay!

 
Step-by-step directions on how to draw a simple line drawing of a marmot.
Click image to open as a PDF.

Draw with a Park Ranger: Yellow-Bellied Marmot

The yellow-bellied marmot (Marmota flaviventris), a member of the squirrel family, sometimes eats food with their hands! These animals like to eat seeds, berries, grasses, insects, and occasionally bird eggs. They are typically 20-28 inch long, groundhog-like creatures, that are found only at high elevations in the park and are adapted to the colder temperatures with their thick reddish-brown fur and yellow belly.

During most of the winter these large rodents are sleeping—they can hibernate up to eight months of the year! Emerging around May, they are social creatures that live in colonies of 10-20 individuals. You may hear them give a shrill whistle, or a “scream” in the colonies to warn others of predators, such as coyotes and golden eagles.

 
Drawing activity to draw yourself as a ranger
Click image to open as a PDF.

Draw Yourself as a Park Ranger

Kids and kids-at-heart, have you ever wanted to be a park ranger? Here's your chance to wear the hat! What kind of ranger would you be? Just a few of the jobs rangers might do include: giving interpretive programs, welcoming visitors at the park entrance, patrolling the wilderness, conducting scientific research, working as first responders (law enforcement, firefighters, EMTs, search and rescue), cleaning or repairing roads and buildings, or working online as web rangers. Download and print our activity image, or draw your own!

 
Coloring sheet with line drawings of Half Dome, trees, cliffs, and a bear.
Click image to open as PDF.

Black Bear and Half Dome Coloring Page

Sit back, relax, and enjoy spending some time coloring one of Yosemite's black bears as it stands in Yosemite with iconic Half Dome in the background.

 
Coloring page with red-winged blackbird and Yosemite Falls
Click image to open as PDF.

Red-Winged Blackbird and Yosemite Falls Coloring Page

Sit back, relax, and enjoy spending some time coloring one of Yosemite's birds as it sits in a meadow with iconic Yosemite Falls in the background.

 
Detailed coloring page of two raccoons; one eating human food and one eating a frog.
Click image to open a PDF of all 4 coloring pages.

Additional Coloring Pages

These detailed coloring pages also share interesting information about protecting wildlife in the park. Fun for kids (and adults!) to enjoy some relaxing time coloring and learning.

 
A black and white line drawing of a raccoon mask
Click image to open as a PDF.

Animal Mask Activity: Set 1

Which Yosemite animal would you be? Download this set of animal masks to print, color, and cut out. Attach a little string, ribbon, or a popsicle stick, and they're ready to wear! This set includes: a black bear, badger, bobcat, deer, fox, pika, and raccoon.

 
A black and white line drawing of an owl mask
Click image to open as a PDF.

Animal Mask Activity: Set 2

Which Yosemite animal would you be? Download this set of animal masks to print, color, and cut out. Attach a little string, ribbon, or a popsicle stick, and they're ready to wear! This set includes: an owl, butterfly, peregrine falcon, frog, weasel, and woodpecker.

 

Fun Facts and Video Clips

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Connect with other National Park Service Sites!

Fortunately we have ways to connect with national parks from a distance through digital opportunities and activities to do in your own home or neighborhood. There are enough activities to keep you occupied for days! Stay connected with national parks on their websites and social media, including live tours, kids activities, reading lists, digital suggestions, and more.

 

We look forward to seeing you in the park once it is open!

 
Collage of 9 image of rangers taking part in different activities in the park.

Last updated: June 1, 2020

Contact the Park

Phone:

209/372-0200

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