Black Bear

A black bear with two cubs. In Yellowstone, about 50% of black bears are black in color, others are brown, blond, or cinnamon.
In Yellowstone, about 50% of black bears are black in color, others are brown, blond, or cinnamon. This black bear is with two cubs.

NPS / Neal Herbert

 

The black bear (Ursus americanus) is the most common and widely distributed bear species in North America. However, the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem is one of the few areas south of Canada where black bears coexist with the grizzly bears. From 1910 to the 1960s, park managers allowed visitors to feed black bears along park roads, although the National Park Service officially frowned on this activity. During this time, along with Old Faithful, black bears became the symbol of Yellowstone for many people, and are still what some people think of when Yellowstone bears are mentioned. Since 1960, park staff have sought to deter bears from becoming conditioned to human foods.

 
 

Population

Little is known about the black bear population in Yellowstone or whether it has been affected by the increase in grizzly bear numbers and distribution since the 1970s. Black bears are commonly observed in the park, especially on the northern range and in the Bechler area of the park. Black bears have few natural predators, although both cubs and adults are occasionally killed by their own kind or by the other large carnivores with which they compete for food— wolves, cougars, and grizzly bears. Vehicle collisions (average = 1 per year) and removals of nuisance bears (average = 1 every 5 years) are not common either. Most black bear mortality in the park is likely attributed to old age or other natural causes. Outside the park, some black bears are killed during state regulated hunting seasons. As their access to human foods has been reduced, human injuries from black bears in the park have decreased from an average of 45 per year during the 1930s–1960s to approximately one injury every five years since 1980. Black bears are occasionally radio-collared for management and scientific reasons, with the latter focusing on research on habitat selection and multi-carnivore interactions.

 
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Duration:
9 minutes, 19 seconds

Everyone loves the bears in Yellowstone. Find out how this love affair has evolved over time. Duration: 9 minutes

 
Black track of a black bear
Track of a black bear

NPS

Description

In Yellowstone, about 50% of black bears are black in color; others are brown, blond, and cinnamon. Black bears eat almost anything, including grass, fruits, tree cambium, eggs, insects, fish, elk calves, and carrion. Their short, curved claws enable them to climb trees, but do not allow them to dig for roots or ants as well as a grizzly bear can.

The life cycle of a black bear is similar to grizzly bears. Like grizzly bears, black bears spend most of their time during fall and winter feeding during hyperphagia. In November they locate or excavate a den on north-facing slopes between 5,800–8,600 feet (1,768–2,621 m) where they hibernate until late March.

Males and females without cubs are solitary, except during the mating season, May to early July. They may mate with a number of individuals, but occasionally a pair stays together for the entire period. Both genders usually begin breeding at age four. Like grizzly bears, black bears also experience delayed implantation. Total gestation time is 200 to 220 days, but only during the last half of this period does fetal development occur.

Birth occurs in mid-January to early February; the female becomes semiconscious during delivery. Usually two cubs are born. At birth, the cubs are blind, toothless, and almost hairless. After delivery the mother continues to sleep for another two months while the cubs nurse and sleep.

 
A grizzly bear walking through the trees near Canyon

Bear Safety

Best practices for traveling safely in bear country.

A grizzly bear in a meadow near Swan Lake

Grizzly Bears

Learn about the biology of this top predator.

A closure sign warns people about the presence of bears on Blacktail Deer Plateau

Bear Management

Bear management has evolved since the park was established.

Photo of a sign indicating a bear management area

Bear Management Areas

Restrictions to reduce encounters between humans and bears.

Sow grizzly nursing cubs

Grizzly Bears & Endangered Species Act

The Yellowstone population of grizzly bears was designated as threatened with extinction in 1975.

A wolf standing on a snowy bank near brown grass howls

Mammals

Home to the largest concentration of mammals in the lower 48 states.

 

Black Bear Related Information

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    Resources

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    Costello, C. M., F. T. van Manen, M. A. Haroldson, M. R. Ebinger, S. Cain, K. Gunther, and D. D. Bjornlie. 2014. Influence of whitebark pine decline on fall habitat use and movements of grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Ecology and Evolution. 4(10):2004-2018.

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    Gunther, K., R. Shoemaker, K. Frey, M. A. Haroldson, S. L. Cain, F. T. van Manen, and J. K. Fortin. 2014. Dietary breadth of grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Ursus. 25(1):60–72.

    Haroldson, M.A., and K.A. Gunther. 2013. Roadside bear viewing opportunities in Yellowstone National Park: characteristics, trends, and influence of whitebark pine. Ursus 24(1):27–41.

    Haroldson, M.A., C.C. Schwartz, K.C. Kendall, K.A. Gunther, D. S. Moody, K. Frey, and D. Paetkau. 2010. Genetic analysis of individual origins supports isolation of grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Ursus 1:1–13.

    Herrero, S. 1985. Bear attacks: Their causes and avoidance. New York: Nick Lyons Books.

    Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team. 2013. Response of Yellowstone grizzly bears to changes in food resources: A synthesis. Report to the Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee and Yellowstone Ecosystem Subcommittee. U.S. Geological Survey, Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center, Bozeman, Montana, USA. https://www.usgs.gov/science/interagency-grizzly-bear-study-team?qt-science_center_objects=4#qt-science_center_objects

    Meagher, M. 2008. Bears in transition, 1959–1970s. Yellowstone Science 16(2): 5–12.

    Middleton, A.D., T.A. Morrison, J.K. Fortin, M.J. Kauffman, C.T. Robbins, K.M. Proffitt, P.J. White, D.E. McWhirter, T.M. Koel, D. Brimeyer, and W.S. Fairbanks. 2013. Grizzly bears link non-native trout to migratory elk in Yellowstone. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 280:20130870.

    Richardson, Leslie, Tatjana Rosen, Kerry Gunther, and Chuck Schwartz. 2014. The economics of roadside bear viewing. Journal of Environmental Management. 140:102-110.

    Schullery, P. 1992. The bears of Yellowstone. Worland, Wyoming: High Plains Publishing Company.

    Schwartz, C.C., M.A. Haroldson, G.C. White, R.B. Harris, S. Cherry, K.A. Keating, D. Moody, and C. Servheen. 2006. Temporal, spatial, and environmental influences on the demographics of grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Wildlife Monographs 161(1):1–68.

    Schwartz, C.C., M.A. Haroldson, and G.C. White. 2010. Hazards affecting grizzly bear survival in the greater Yellowstone ecosystem. Journal of Wildlife Management 74(4):654–667.

    Schwartz, C.C., M.A. Haroldson, K. West, and et al. Yellowstone grizzly bear investigations: Annual reports of the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team, Edited by US Department of the Interior. Bozeman, MT.

    Teisberg, J. E., Haroldson, M. A., Schwartz, C. C., Gunther, K. A., Fortin, J. K. and Robbins, C. T. 2014. Contrasting past and current numbers of bears visiting Yellowstone cutthroat trout streams. Journal of Wildlife Management, 78: 369–378.

    White, P.J., R.A. Garrott, and G.E. Plumb, eds. 2013. Yellowstone’s Wildlife in Transition. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.

    van Manen, F. T., Ebinger, M. R., Haroldson, M. A., Harris, R. B., Higgs, M. D., Cherry, S., White, G. C. and Schwartz, C. C. (2014), Re-Evaluation of Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Population Dynamics not Supported by Empirical Data: Response to Doak & Cutler. Conservation Letters, 7: 323–331.

    Last updated: January 10, 2018

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