Lesson Plan

Mississippi Native American System of Government

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Grade Level:
High School: Ninth Grade through Twelfth Grade
Subject:
Social Studies
Lesson Duration:
60 Minutes
State Standards:
1. Identify the major Native American groups found living in Mississippi by the first European explorers in the region and discuss their governmental and economic systems. (DOK 2)
2. Describe the history of people who first lived in Mississippi
Additional Standards:
Geography for Life 17. How to apply geography to interpret the past.
CCS: Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
NCSS Themes: Time, continuity, and change
Thinking Skills:
Analyzing: Break down a concept or idea into parts and show the relationships among the parts.

Objective

1. How did the Mississippi environment influence the development of a highly developed system of government?
2. How did the Mississippi Native Americans organize their government?
3. What role did the clan play in Native American Societies
4. Why was it necessary for the Native American Societies to develop a system of government to protect their way of life?

Background

For the complete lesson plan, please email natr_education@nps.gov or call 1-800-305-7417. Please indicate whether or not you need an accessible lesson plan.

Special feature on a teaching strategy used in lesson.

  • Working in pairs will encourage student collaboration.
  • Before During and After strategies to promote literacy, student engagement and understanding.
  • Using the big idea to support long-term understanding.

ABC Brainstorm can be used to activate prior knowledge about a major topic

The jigsaw literacy strategy allows students:

  • To engage with the text
  • Respond to the text through discussion.

The Exit Slip Strategy requires students to:

  • Reflect on content of lesson.
  • Write answers to questions you ask at the end of class.

Exit slips help students:

  • Reflect on what they have learned.
  •  State what or how they are thinking about the new information.

 Easily integrate writing into your content area classroom and require students to think critically.

The Exit Slip Strategy requires students to:

  • Reflect on content of lesson.
  • Write answers to questions you ask at the end of class.

Exit slips help students:

  • Reflect on what they have learned.
  •  State what or how they are thinking about the new information.

 Easily integrate writing into your content area classroom and require students to think critically.

 

 

Preparation

Teacher Activities Before the Lesson:

Research information on the topic to be taught

Make all relevant photocopies.

Materials

Lesson Hook/Preview

Special feature on a teaching strategy used in lesson.

  • Working in pairs will encourage student collaboration.
  • Before During and After strategies to promote literacy, student engagement and understanding.
  • Using the big idea to support long-term understanding.

Procedure

Before: ABC Brainstorm

Procedures:

  • Present the word GOVERNMENT to the students.
  • Students should list all the letters of the alphabet down on their notebook paper, leaving room beside each letter to write out the word or phrase.
  • Students work on their own thinking and writing as many words as they can that are related with the topic beside the suitable letter.
  • Give them some time to work on the assignment, then let student pair up to fill the blank letters they are yet to complete.
  • Give students a chance to share what they have written down with the class.

 

During Reading: Jigsaw

Procedure:

  • Divide class into groups of 5. Each member will be an expert on a different topics assigned by the teacher.
  •  Students can use a graphic organizer to take notes. Topics include finding the duties and responsibilities of different groups in the society. Sample provided below:

 

Name

Duties and Responsibilities

Tribal Council

 

Representatives

 

Clans

 

Chiefs

 

Men

 

Women

 

The role of the environment

 

 

  •  Team members with the same topic come together to research different resource materials on the same topic. The assigned textbook or informational text relating to the topic can be used to complete the assignment.
  • The students prepare how they will teach or share the information with other group members.
  • Everyone returns to their jigsaw (home) teams to teach what they learned to the other members. Remember to ask students to write down what they learned in their notebooks.
  • Team members listen and take notes as their classmate teaches them.

 

After Reading: Exit Slips

 

Procedure

  • At the end of your lesson or five minutes before the end of class, ask students to respond to a prompt you pose to the class.
  • You may state the prompt orally to your students or project it visually on an overhead projector or smart board.
  • Distribute 3X5 cards for students to write their responses on or allow students to write on loose-leaf paper.
  • As students leave your room they should turn in their exit slips.
  • Collect the exit slips as a part of either a formal or informal assessment.

Questions:

  1. How did the Mississippi environment influence the development of a highly developed system of government?
  2. How did the Mississippi Native Americans organize their government?
  3. What role did the clan play in Native American Societies?

Why was it necessary for the Native American Societies to develop a system of government to protect their way of life?

Vocabulary

Tribal Council: Governing body that made important decisions

Representatives: A person chosen to act or speak for the tribe

Clans: Groups of families that are related.

Exogamy: When one marries outside the clan

Polygamy: The practice of marrying more than one wife

Additional Resources

Story Maps and PowerPoint Presentations
 

Contact Information

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Last updated: January 8, 2018