Activity Modules

Gold Rush exhibit

Module 1: Don't Judge A Book By Its Cover

As the title implies, we can be quick to form an opinion about someone based solely on a split second first impression. It could be from a sideward glance walking down the street or a simple greeting on the telephone, but we all have done it. What if you could slow down your impulse reaction and actually find out more about someone before forming an opinion? You might be amazed at what you could learn.

Woman serves food

Activity 1

Attitudes and Appearances

We often form negative opinions about those who speak differently, but how much can we really tell about a person by the way they sound or look? In this activity, see if it is possible to determine a person's background or ethnicity by the way they speak. Expand your horizons by listening to their words, not their accents.

Colorful mask display

Activity 2

Many Languages, One Country

We often form negative opinions about those who speak differently, but how much can we really tell about a person by the way they sound or look? In this activity, see if it is possible to determine a person's background or ethnicity by the way they speak. Expand your horizons by listening to their words, not their accents.

Stereoscope artifact exhibit

Activity 3

How Much Are You Influenced by the Media?

Our opinions about immigration and immigrants are shaped by the information we receive in the media. In this activity, you will examine and analyze a number of media pieces to see how they relate to actual events in history. The influence of the media may be greater than you realize.


Curriculum Standards

The activities in this module relate to the following California State Curriculum Standards. Depending on your what you choose to emphasize in these activities, you might find other standards that are applicable.


activity

Activity 1 Curriculum Standards – Attitudes and Appearance

Grade 9: Area Studies: Cultures, sociology, ethnic studies, law-related education

11.8 Students analyze the economic boom and social transformation of post-World War II America.
8. Discuss the forms of popular culture, with emphasis on their origins and geographic diffusion (e.g. jazz and other forms of popular music, professional sports, architectural and artistic styles).
11.11 Students analyze the major social problems and domestic policy issues in contemporary American society.
1. Discuss the reasons for the nation’s changing immigration policy, with emphasis on how the Immigration Act of 1965 and successor acts have transformed American society.
12.3 Students evaluate and take and defend positions on what the fundamental values and principles of civil society are, their interdependence, and the meaning and importance of those values and principles for a free society.
12.10 Students formulate questions about and defend their analyses of tensions within our constitutional democracy and the importance of maintaining a balance between the following concepts: majority rule and individual rights; liberty and equality; state and national authority in a federal system; civil disobedience and the rule of law; freedom of the press and the right to a fair trial; the relationship of religion and government.
Activity

Activity 2 Curriculum Standards – Many Languages, One Country

11.11 Students analyze the major social problems and domestic policy issues in contemporary American society.
1. Discuss the reasons for the nation’s changing immigration policy, with emphasis on how the Immigration Act of 1965 and successor acts have transformed American society.
7. Explain how the federal, state and local governments have responded to demographic and social changes such as population shifts to the suburbs, racial concentrations in the cities, Frostbelt-to-Sunbelt migration, international migration, decline of family farms, increases in out-of-wedlock births, and drug abuse.
12.2 Students evaluate and take and defend positions on the scope and limits of rights and obligations as citizens, the relationship among them, and how they are secured.
6. Explain how one becomes a citizen of the United States, including the process of naturalization (e.g. literacy, language, and other requirements).
12.3 Students evaluate and take and defend positions on what the fundamental values and principles of civil society are, their interdependence, and the meaning and importance of those values and principles for a free society.
Activity

Activity 3 Curriculum Standards – How Much are you Influenced by the Media?

12.2 Students evaluate and take and defend positions on the scope and limits of rights and obligations as citizens, the relationship among them, and how they are secured.
6. Explain how one becomes a citizen of the United States, including the process of naturalization (e.g. literacy, language, and other requirements).
12.3 Students evaluate and take and defend positions on what the fundamental values and principles of civil society are, their interdependence, and the meaning and importance of those values and principles for a free society.
12.5 Students summarize landmark U.S. Supreme Court interpretations of the Constitution and its amendments.
12.8 Students evaluate and take and defend positions on the influence of media on American political life.
12.10 Students formulate questions about and defend their analyses of tensions within our constitutional democracy and the importance of maintaining a balance between the following concepts: majority rule and individual rights; liberty and equality; state and national authority in a federal system; civil disobedience and the rule of law; freedom of the press and the right to a fair trial; the relationship of religion and government.

Links

The articles referenced here represent varying viewpoints on the subject of immigration and are meant to stimulate thought and provoke discussion. Please note that PCIM does not necessarily endorse the information contained in these articles or the source(s) of the information.

Activity 1 Links

Protected Classes Under Title VII (7)
Prohibits discrimination based on cultural differences (Armenians, Gypsies, Cajuns, etc. . Grooming and clothing practices protected. Bhatia v. .

Disregard Prejudices
How can people learn to disregard prejudices based on race, appearance?
We live in a world full of hate, competition, crime, envy, carelessness, .
Yahoo Answers Discussion
Dr. Robi Ludwig

Hate crime reports up in wake of terrorist attacks
CNN, September 17, 2001 Posted: 7:15 AM EDT (1115 GMT)

Bruin speakers rally against hate
Mai Hong, (Contact)
Published: Wednesday, January 31, 2007
The Daily Bruin (UCLA), Wednesday, January 9, 2008

Schoolgirl in Oklahoma Fights for Muslim Identity
U.S. Department of Justice supports right to wear hijab in school 08 April 2004
By Afzal Khan
Washington File Special Correspondent


More Muslim girls taking up athletics in traditional hijab
Some say it's time to help those in head scarf to feel welcome
by Jeff Karoub,
Associated Press,
Sunday, December 16, 2007

Muslim scarf raises a few concerns
Oakland Tribune, Oct 25, 2003
by Wayne Parry, Associated Press

Understanding Turbans: Don't Link Them to Terrorism
By Eli Sanders
The Seattle Times, Sep. 27, 2001

TSA: Turbans Don't Have to Be Removed
by Eileen Sullivan (AP, October 16, 2007)

RCMP Hiring
The RCMP went through its hiring and training manuals to learn if the induction of turbaned Sikhs would cause any systematic barriers. February 1, 2003

Two Sikhs Win Back Jobs Lost by Wearing Turbans
By James Barron
(Published: July 29, 2004), The New York Times, Wednesday, January 9, 2008

Asian Americans Remain Vigilant Against Hate Crimes
New America Media, News Feature, Julia Kitlinski-Hong, Posted: Jul 12, 2007


Activity 2 Links

Bilingualism Persists, But English Still Dominates
By Richard Alba
Lewis Mumford Center for Comparative Urban and Regional Research, State University of New York at Albany

What Immigrants Say About Life in the United States (Report Synopsis)
By Steve Farkas
Senior Vice President of Public Agenda,
Migration Policy Institute
May 2003

Now that I am Here: What Immigrants Say About Life in the United States
By Steve Farkas, Ann Duffett, and Jean Johsnon

Marie Cocco: The language of Immigrants
By Marie Cocco -
Published 12:00 am PST Tuesday, December 4, 2007

In Plain English: Let's Make It Official
Sunday, Jun. 04, 2006
By Charles Krauthammer

Spanglish is a growing language for immigrants
By Andrew Marshall
Deseret Morning News
Published: Monday, June 25, 2007 12:37 a.m. MDT

Involuntary Language Loss Among Immigrants: Asian-American Linguistic Autobiographies
Leanne Hinton, University of California, Berkeley
December 1999

Immigrants Infuse English Language with Dynamism
Hispanics, Asians are reinvigorating English, professor says - 20 August 2007
By Carolee Walker
USINFO Staff Writer


Activity 3 Links

Effects of the Press on Spanish-American Relations in 1898

By John Baker

Alien Menace
Michael O’Malley, Associate Professor of History ad Art, George Mason University

Dart Center for Photojournalism & Trauma
1. The History of Photojournalism

Media Accuracy: A Fleeting Moment of Balanced Immigration Coverage
by Kristen Bodossian and Otto Santa Ana - 13 Dec 2007
North American Congress On Latin America

Social Contract Journal Issues : Spring 2002
Report from the Media Standards Project
By Joe Guzzardi
Volume 12, Number 3 (Spring 2002)
Issue theme: "Media coverage on immigration - where's the balance?"

Self-Study Unit 3: Photography & Trauma
1. The History of Photojournalism


Helpful Guides

Education site of the National Archives and Records Administration
You can find educational resources for different eras of U.S. History and you can download media analysis worksheets such as the ones listed below.

Photograph Analysis
Worksheet for classrooms from the National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, MD

Cartoon Analysis
Worksheet for classrooms from the National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, MD

Movie Analysis
Worksheet for classrooms from the National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, MD


Reference Books

Covering Immigration
Popular Images and the Politics of the Nation
Leo R. Chavez
University of California Press, July 2001
ISBN 978-0-520-22436-0

Unreliable Sources
A Guide to Detecting Bias in News Media
Martin A. Lee and Norman Solomon
A Lyle Stuart, Carol Publishing Group, 1990

Last updated: January 19, 2017

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