Middle School & High School Programs

Students measure and record saguaro's observations.
Students measure and record observations from a saguaro.

NPS Photo

Saguaro Plot Survey: Scientific studies surrounding the saguaro (7th grade and up)

The Park monitors saguaros through a Saguaro Census, a citizen science project conducted every 10 years. This curriculum-based program, with a focus on real, citizen science, will build on the Saguaro Census research program for 7th grade science classes. Students will gather scientific data on saguaros that will benefit the park's long-term monitoring program, tie into a climate change research, and provide the student with a wilderness experience. Students will survey saguaros and collect data in the field that will assist park researchers who are determining the current status of saguaros in the park. Tools that students will use include the following; GPS units, clinometers, digital cameras, Kestral mini weather stations, and compasses. The off-trail hike through rugged terrain will not only provide an opportunity for them to make a personal connection to nature, but will also expose them to Leave No Trace concepts. Classes are encouraged to have lunch in the picnic area after the program. A classroom pre-visit, one week prior to the field trip, prepares the students with the base knowledge to enhance their park experience and provides them for the field trip.

Available: October to April, 9:30a.m.-12:00p.m.
Group Size: 1 class
 
Students use wildlife camera
Students use wildlife camera.

NPS Photo

Lost Carnivores: Do these species still exist in the park? Students collect data that helps the park find the answer. (7th grade and up)

Preface: Anecdotal evidence indicates that the Tucson Mountains may have lost 5 species of small carnivores due to increasing urban development that surrounds them. These species may be particularly vulnerable due to natural population fluctuations and increasing isolation of the Tucson Mountains. After a recent inventory, no photos were obtained of these small carnivores that had been observed in the past few decades. The park is now engaged in comprehensive research to determine if indeed these species are no longer in the park.

During this field trip, students will become citizen scientists and collect real world data that will assist managers with a real world problem. The field trip will contribute to the understanding of multiple species within an ecosystem and focus on identifying linkages necessary for wildlife movement, a critical need in this district of the park, especially riparian corridors. Students will set and check wildlife cameras in the park, gather data around the camera iste, sketch and map the area, and will record notes about the site's environment in a provided journal. Tools that students will use include the following; wildlife cameras, GPS units, digital cameras, and Kestral mini weather stations. The off-trail hike through rugged terrain will not only provide an opportunity for them to make a personal connection to nature, but will also expose them to Leave No Trace concepts. Classes are encouraged to have lunch in the picnic area after the program. A classroom pre-visit, one week prior to the field trip, prepares the students with the base knowleedge to enhance their park experience and provides them for the field trip.

Available: October to April, 9:30a.m.-12:00p.m.
Group Size: 1 class
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To see what our past school programs have caught on wildlife cameras, please visit our Flickr page!

Last updated: August 7, 2018

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

3693 S Old Spanish Trail
Tucson , AZ 85730

Phone:

(520) 733-5153

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