Science Behind the Scenes Series

Flood Research

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Duration:
5 minutes, 5 seconds

Colorado's September 2013 floods affected many areas in Rocky Mountain National Park.  Researchers are studying this latest chapter in the park's natural history.

 

Willow Research

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Duration:
4 minutes, 43 seconds

Willows in Moraine Park have declined due to many different environmental impacts and pressures. Learn about current research related to these riparian shrubs, and discover the role they play in wetland ecosystems.

 

Bears

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Duration:
14 minutes, 8 seconds

Seeing a wild bear is an unforgettable experience! Black bears eat, sleep, and live here. Rocky is an important place for bears. And we hope it is a special place for you. We care about bears. Will you?

 
a photo of a tree damaged by mountain pine beetle

The Mountain Pine Beetle
Why are there so many brown trees? The Mountain Pine Beetle is one of several common, native insects that challenge western pine forests. Drought conditions, mild winters, dwarf mistletoe infestations, dense late seral mature forest stands, and a lack of wildland fires have contributed to the outbreak. The scale of the current beetle epidemic is unprecedented in historic times, with millions of acres of trees being affected throughout the West from Mexico to British Columbia.

Broadband users click here. Dial-up users click here. iPod users click here. For a printable version of the script, click here.

 
Photo Bighorn sheep ram

Bighorn Sheep
Bighorn sheep are often referred to as Rocky's signature species. These hearty-looking animals are surprisingly fragile. Learn more about these elusive and fascinating creatures.

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Photo elk feeding in meadow

                                                          

Elk & Vegetation Management Plan
The National Park Service (NPS) has released the Final Elk and Vegetation Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the park. The result of seven years of research, followed by four years of planning, the plan will use adaptive management principles and guide park management for the next 20 years. This 12-minute video introduces this fascinating and complex topic.

Broadband users click here. For a captioned version, click here. Dial-up users click here. For a printable version of the script, click here.

 
Photo clear air quality day of Longs Peak and Mount Meeker

Air Quality
There are days when visibility is more than 200 miles. Unfortunately those days are not as common anymore. Learn how scientists at Rocky Mountain National Park are studying and monitoring air quality in the park.


Broadband users click here. For a captioned version, click here. Dial-up users click here. For a printable version of the script, click here. iPod users click here.

 
a photo of a wood frog

Soundscapes
What do elk and frogs have in common? This segment of Behind the Scenes will take a brief look at two park research projects, one focused on frogs and one on elk. As different as these topics seem, the projects have something in common: they both involve studying sound.

Broadband users click here. For captioned version, click here. Dial-up users click here. For a printable version of the script, click here.

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

1000 US Hwy 36
Estes Park, CO 80517

Phone:

(970) 586-1206
Have questions? We've got answers! Call 8am–4:30pm Mountain Time to speak with park staff (recorded information after hours). For Trail Ridge Road status, call (970) 586-1222.

Contact Us