Reporting on Competitive Grants
preservation work in action at Fort Davis

State, Tribal, Local, Plans & Grants


Cultural Resources National Park Service

Reporting on Competitive Grants


Reporting and Grant Requirements

Grantees should meet all of the requirements and conditions outlined in their grant agreement. The Historic Preservation Fund Grants Manual, provides detailed guidance on all grants funded through the Historic Preservation Fund.

The objective of your reporting is to provide information to the National Park Service about accomplishments under your grant agreement. The grant agreement is the document that outlines all requirements for your award and is a legal document. You are required to comply with the terms and conditions of your grant agreement.

Before Submitting A Report
  • Read your grant agreement
  • Know your grant number, also called a Federal Award Identification Number (FAIN), because you should include it in reporting information
  • Be familiar with the scope of work and deliverables under your grant agreement

Interim Reports

Interim reports must be submitted every six months unless otherwise stated in your grant agreement. All reports must be accompanied by the SF-425 Federal Financial Report as well as a printed history of reimbursements made through the end of the reporting period. In addition, all interim reports and the final report must be submitted with the appropriate SF-428 Tangible Personal Property Report even if no equipment has been purchased using grant funds. A complete interim and final report will include all information as outlined in your grant agreement.

A complete interim report will include at least:

All reimbursements to grantees are made through the Automated Standard Application for Payments (ASAP) operated by the Department of the Treasury. Grantees must request reimbursements directly through ASAP. Details on using ASAP to request reimbursements, establish user roles, or generate required drawdown history reports may be found on our ASAP overview page. Some grantees are required to submit an SF-270 Request for Advance or Reimbursement to their grant manager for approval prior to drawing down funds. Please review your grant agreement for details on how to request payment and if prior approval from NPS is necessary before making a drawdown.

Final Reports

Final reports are due upon completion of the project or 90 days after the end of the grant period, whichever comes first. All reports must be accompanied by the SF-425 Federal Financial Report as well as a printed history of reimbursements made through the end of the reporting period. In addition, the final report must be submitted with the appropriate SF-428 Tangible Personal Property Report even if no equipment has been purchased using grant funds. A complete final report will include all information as outlined in your grant agreement.

A complete final report will include at least:

All reimbursements to grantees are made through the Automated Standard Application for Payments (ASAP) operated by the Department of the Treasury. Grantees must request reimbursements directly through ASAP. Details on using ASAP to request reimbursements, establish user roles, or generate required drawdown history reports may be found on our ASAP overview page. Some grantees are required to submit an SF-270 Request for Advance or Reimbursement to their grant manager for approval prior to drawing down funds. Please review your grant agreement for details on how to request payment and if prior approval from NPS is necessary before making a drawdown.

Grant Requirements

In addition to interim and final reporting requirements, grantees must submit a variety of documentation to stay in compliance with the terms of their grant agreement.

Completing the SF-270 Request for Advance or Reimbursement

Your grant agreement will indicate whether or not you are required to complete this form. If you are required to sumbit an SF-270, it must be submitted and approved prior to you drawing down funds from ASAP. Make sure to put your grant number in either block 4 of block 7. Use block 5 to sequentially number your drawdown requests; if this is your first drawdown request, enter "1" in block 5. For your second request, you would ender "2" in block 5 and so on. In block 11, you should only use column A. Instructions for completing the rest of the form are on page 3 of the form; this instruction page does not need to be returned to your grant manager when you submit the SF-270 for review.

SF-428 Tangible Personal Property Report Review

There are five versions of the SF-428 series; the exact form submitted depends on what action is happening.

SF-428 Series Form Overview
Submit this form... when...
SF-428 You are submitting any of the other SF-428 forms; this form is a coversheet.
SF-428A You are submitting an interim report; this form should be accompanied by the SF-428. You should submit this form with every interim report, whether or not you purchased any equipment.
SF-428B You are submitting a final report. You should submit this form with the final report, wheter or not you purchased any equipment.
SF-428C You are requesting permission to dispose of equipment (property) at any time before the end of the grant.
SF-428S You need more space than is available on another form.

Compliance Documentation

Some grants have additional reporting requirements such as draft work products, draft architectural plans and specifications, and consultant qualifications. These must be submitted to your National Park Service grant manager for review and approval prior to moving forward with the project.

Environmental Screening Form
This worksheet captures information to ensure compliance with NEPA. It is meant to be a guide to completing the required NEPA review process for development and archeology projects. You may use another format to provide this information as long as the required data is provided to your grant manager or NPS technical reviewer. The National Preservation Institute provides an overview of the NEPA review process in general.

National Historic Landmarks
Projects involving National Historic Landmarks will have additional reporting requirements. You should work with your grant manager to submit any needed information. The State, Tribal, Local, Plans & Grants Division will need to work with National Park Service regional office staff to review your project.

National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 & "Section 106"
Grants funded by the Historic Preservation Fund are subject to review under what is popularly called "Section 106" of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended. Section 106, formally 54 USC 306108, requires Federal agencies to consider the impact (called "effect") of Federally funded projects on historic resources. The State, Tribal, Local, Plans & Grants Division will work with State and Tribal Historic Preservation Offices on your behalf to coordinate this review. The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation has prepared a helpful guide to this process.

Easements

A key term of your grant agreement is that you will agree to assume, after the completion of the project, the total cost of continued maintenance, repair and administration of the grant-assisted property in a manner satisfactory to the Secretary of the Interior. Accordingly, recipients awarded funds for the physical preservation of a historic site shall sign a Preservation Covenant/Easement with the State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) in which the site is located or with a nonprofit preservation organization acceptable and approved in writing by the NPS. A draft covenant/easement must be submitted to the NPS for review within one calendar year of the date a grant agreement is signed. Following the completion of all grant-assisted work, the preservation covenant/easement must document the grant-assisted condition of the site and the character defining features. The covenant/easement must then be executed by registering it with the deed of the property. A certified copy of the executed covenant/easement must be submitted to the NPS prior to the end of the award period of performance.

In brief, grantees undertaking development projects are required to place an easement (also called a covenant) on the entire property in order to protect the grant-assisted work. These requirements are described more fully in the Historic Preservation Fund Grants Manual. Develpment projects include both construction, sometimes referred to as "bricks and mortar" work, and any ground-disturbing activity.

Other grant programs, like Save America's Treasures, have had different required easement terms. In addition, some easement-holding organizations may require different terms as a condition of holding the easement; for example, some states will only hold easements in perpetuity.

The minimum required term for easements executed under all grant programs is outlined below. The term of the easement is based upon the amount of Federal grant funds received. Some jurisdictions may refer to the easement as a covenant or, in lieu of an easment, require a covenant. Regardless of the name, the minimum term limits below still apply and the document must be recorded on the property deed. Costs associated with the preparation and filing of the preservation agreement, covenant, or easement are eligible to be charged to your grant.

Model Easement
A model easement that meets minimum grant requirements is available; however, it will need to be modified to meet local, state, or tribal requirements.

All grantees should note that NPS is revising the easement, covenant, and preservation agreement requirements for grants made after October 1, 2020.

Please carefully review the tables below along with your grant agreement to determine which is appropriate to use for your grant.
Easement, Covenant, or Preservation Agreement Duration for Awards Made Before September 30, 2020
Grant Amount Time Requirement / Type of Document
$1-$10,000 5-year minimum preservation agreement; covenant amending the deed is not required
$10,001-$25,000 5-year minimum covenant
$25,001-$50,000 10-year minimum covenant
$50,001-$100,000 15-year minimum covenant
$100,001+ 20-year minimum covenant
Note that Save America's Treasures grants require a 50-year covenant/easement.

Easement, Covenant, or Preservation Agreement Duration for Awards Made After October 1, 2020
The following easement, covenant, or preservation agreement requirements apply to all competitive grants (also called project grants) awarded on or after October 1, 2020. The competitive grant programs include African American Civil Rights, Save America's Treasures, Tribal Heritage Grants, Paul Bruhn Historic Revitalization Grants Program, and Historically Black Colleges & Universities grant programs. The term of the preservation covenant/easement is dependent on the amount of assistance the historic property receives.
  • If the historic property is not currently protected by a preservation covenant/easement, a preservation covenant/easement must be executed for a term as given in the table below per the amount of funding awarded.
  • If the historic property is currently subject to a preservation covenant/easement that meets the minimum federal preservation requirements, an extension must be executed for an additional duration to meet the requirements of the new funding awarded. Required term is identified in the table below. For example, if a property had 10 years remaining on a previous 20-year easement, and receives $300,000 in HPF funding, an amendment to add 15 years would be required.
  • If the historic property is currently protected by a perpetual or other preservation covenant/easement that meets or exceeds the requirements of this grant program as determined by the NPS, no additional duration or restrictions are necessary
Grant Amount Time Requirement / Type of Document
$1-$50,000 5-year minimum preservation agreement; covenant / easement amending the deed is not required
$50,001-$250,000 10-year minimum covenant / easement
$250,001-$500,000 15-year minimum covenant / easement
$500,001-$750,000 20-year minimum covenant / easement
$750,001+ 25-year minimum covenant / easement

Additional Sample Documents for Recipients & Contractors

In addition to interim reports, final reports, and compliance documentation, grantees are often required to comply with other grant award terms and conditions. To assist grantees, we have assembled a variety of sample or model documents. These model documents include matching fund documentation, volunteer services documentation, sample contract approval documentation, and project sign guidance.