State, Tribal, and Local Plans & Grants
  • Sweeney Hall, LoMoyne-Owen College, Memphis, TN; Emery Hall, Central State University, Wilberforce, OH; Academic Hall, Hampton University, Hampton, VA

    State, Tribal, and Local Plans & Grants


    Cultural Resources National Park Service

HBCU Grant Program Funded Projects


In 1980, President Jimmy Carter signed Executive Order 12232 and established the White House Initiative on HBCUs. The initiative was created to provide a structure to help HBCUs have access to, participate in, and benefit from Federally funded programs.

Since then, Presidents Ronald Reagan, George Bush, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush have all signed Executive Orders to reaffirm the mandate begun by Carter, further strengthening the HBCU grants program and giving it national attention. An outgrowth of the 1980 White House Initiative on HBCUs was the Secretary of the Interior’s Historic Preservation Initiative, established to identify and restore those historic structures on HBCU campuses considered to be the most historically significant and physically threatened by a likelihood of loss of the structure if work was not performed as soon as possible to save it. The Historic Preservation Initiative was also established in direct response to the needs of many of the historically black colleges and universities which were presented with critical rehabilitation needs but lacked the resources to repair these buildings.

At first, HBCUs were required to raise 50 percent of the funds locally to match the federal grant. Gradually, the matching requirement was lowered, and in 2004 it reduced to 30 percent. In 2009, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) earmarked $15 million in the NPS budget for the HBCU Preservation Program. The matching fund requirement was lifted to stimulate local economies immediately, and 20 HBCUs received federal grants to stabilize and preserve historic structures on their campuses.

To determine the most historically significant and physically threatened structures, a questionnaire was sent to all HBCUs requesting documentation about their historic buildings. This survey was completed by 46 HBCUs, and a list of 144 buildings were identified. From these, a Field Assessment Team, composed of National Park Service (NPS) Southeast Regional Office employees and private sector preservation professionals selected 12 buildings as the most historically significant and endangered buildings on HBCU campuses (this number was ultimately reduced to 11). To make the determination, they evaluated the historical significance, architectural integrity, and threat for each resource. After selecting these 11 buildings, they provided each school with a condition assessment of each (identified) building. This assessment identified problems and offered recommendations.

Currently Funded Projects

The National Park Service and the Department of the Interior are pleased to announce the FY2017 and FY2018 Historically Black Colleges and Universities grants from the Historic Preservation Fund. NPS has awarded $8.6 million in funding for 19 projects in 9 states that will promote the physical preservation of National Register listed sites on HBCU campuses. This year, over 44 applications were received, requesting over $20 million in funding. FY2017 was the first year since 2009 that the National Park Service has awarded grants through the Historically Black Colleges and Universities grant program. FY2019 funding is yet to be determined by Congress. To view the awarded HBCUs please refer to the HBCU Award Press Release.

Previously Funded Projects

In 1988, the first grants to document, preserve, and stabilize historic structures on HBCU campuses were awarded to rehabilitate 11 historic structures:

1. Gaines Hall (North Hall), Morris Brown College, Atlanta, GA
2. Leonard Hall, Shaw University, Raleigh, NC
3. Hill Hall, Savannah State University, Savannah, GA
4. St. Agnes Chapel, St. Augustine's College, Raleigh, NC
5. John Boddie Mansion, Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, MS
6. White Hall, Bethune-Cookman College, Daytona Beach, FL
7. Graves Hall, Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA
8. Howard Hall, Howard University, Washington, DC
9. Virginia Hall, Hampton University, Hampton, VA
10. Packard Hall, Spelman College, Atlanta, GA
11. Loockerman Hall, Delaware State University, Dover, DE

The second round of grants (FY 1995-FY 1999), under the Historic Preservation Fund (HPF) Grant Program through the United Negro College Fund (UNCF), included funding to rehabilitate the following 11 historic structures:

1. Bethune-Cookman College, Daytona Beach, FL 1997
2. Delaware State University, Dover, DE, 1999
3. Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA 1999
4. Hampton University, Hampton, VA, 1998 and 1999
5. Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA, 1998
6. St. Augustin College, Raleigh, NC, 1996
7. Savanah State College, Savannah, GA, 1996
8. Shaw University, Raleigh, NC, 1995 and 1997
9. Spelman College, Atlanta, Ga, 1999
10. Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, MS, 1997

The third round of grants (1998-2001) was under the Omnibus Parks HBCU Grant and included funding to rehabilitate historic structures at the following HBCUs:

1. Allen University, Columbia, SC 1998, 1999 and 2000
2. Benedict College, Columbia, SC, 2000
3. Claflin University, Orangeburg, SC, 1999, 2000
4. Concordia College, Selma, Al, 1999
5. Fisk University, Nashville, TN, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001
6. Knoxville college, Knoxville, TN, 1998, 1999, 2000
7. Miles College, Fairfield, Al, 1999, 2000 and 2001
8. Rust College, Holly Spring, MS, 1999, 2000 and 2001
9. Selma University, Selma, Al, 1998
10. Stillman College, Tuscaloosa, AL, 1999
11. Talladega College, Talladega, AL, 1999, 2000 and 2001
12. Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, MS, 1998, 1999, 2000 and 2001
13. Voorhees College, Denmark, SC, 1999, 2000 and 2001
14. Alabama A&M University, Huntsville, AL 2001
15. Bluefield State College, Bluefield, WV, 2001
16. Bowie State University, Bowie, MD
17. Cheyney University, Cheyney, PA 1998, 2001
18. Fisk University, Nashville, TN,
19. Grambling State University, Grambling, LA, 2001
20. Hampton University, Hampton, VA, 2001
21. Huston-Tillotson College, Austin, TX, 2001
22. Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 2001
23. Jarvis Christian College, Hawlins, TX, 2001
24. Lincoln University, Jefferson City, MO, 2001
25. Johnson C. Smith University, Charlotte, NC
26. North Carolina Central, Durham, NC, 2001
27. Philander Smith College, Little Rock, AR, 1998 and 2001
28. Benedict College, Columbia, SC, 2000
29. Dillard University, New Orleans, LA, 1999
30. Elizabeth City State University, Elizabeth City, NC, 2000
31. North Carolina A&T, Greensboro, NC, 1999
32. Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN, 1998, 1999 and 2000
33. Central State University, Wilberforce, OH, 2000 and 2001

The 4th round of grants was awarded in FY 2004 from the Historic Preservation Fund (HPF) Grant Program. The following HBCUs were recipients of awards for rehabilitation of their historic structures:

1. Alabama A & M University, Huntsville, AL
2. Alcorn State University, Lorman, MS
3. Arkansas Baptist College, Little Rock, AR
4. Bennett College, Greensboro, NC
5. Fisk University, Nashville, TN
6. South Carolina State University, Greensboro, SC

The 5th round of grants was awarded in FY 2005 from the HPF. The following HBCUs were recipients of awards for rehabilitation of their historic structures:

1. Alcorn State University, Lorman, MS
2. Bennett College, Greensboro, NC
3. Kentucky State University, Frankfort, KY
4. LeMoyne-Owen College, Memphis, TN
5. Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, TX
6. Saint Paul’s College, Saint Paul, VA
7. Virginia Union University, Richmond, VA
8. Virginia University at Lynchburg, Lynchburg, VA
9. Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA
10. Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA

The 6th round of grants was awarded in FY 2006 from the HPF. The following HBCUs were recipients of awards for rehabilitation of their historic structures

1. Alabama A&M University, Huntsville, AL
2. Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL
3. Arkansas Baptist College, Little Rock, AR
4. Fort Valley State University, Fort Valley, GA
5. Hampton University, Hampton, GA
6. Kentucky State University, Frankfort, KY
7. LeMoyne-Onwen College, Memphis, TN
8. University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Prince Ann, MD
9. Virginia University At Lynchburg, Lynchburg, VA

The program was successfully completed in 2012 with the restoration of the following 21 historic properties:

1. Belles Lettres Hall, Alcorn State University, Alcorn, Mississippi
2. Chappelle Auditorium, Allen University, Columbia, South Carolina
3. Ethel Black Hall, Bennett College for Women, Greensboro, North Carolina
4. Emery Hall, Central State University, Wilberforce, Ohio
5. Melrose Cottage, Cheyney University of Pennsylvania, Cheyney, Pennsylvania
6. Trevor Arnett Hall, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia
7. Camphor/Hartzell Complex, Dillard University, New Orleans, Louisiana
8. Moore Hall Auditorium, Elizabeth City State University, Elizabeth City, North Carolina
9. John Wesley Work House, Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee
10. George M. Sampson Hall, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, Florida
11. Vashon Community Center, Harris-Stowe State University, St. Louis, Missouri
12. Miner Normal School, Howard University, Washington, District of Columbia
13. Old Federal Building & Post Office, Kentucky State University, Frankfort, Kentucky
14. Cottage Row Historic District, Langston University, Langston, Oklahoma
15. Hulda Margaret Lyttle Hall, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tennessee
16. Fine Arts Building, St. Paul's College, Lawrenceville, Virginia
17. Saul Building, St. Paul's College, Lawrenceville, Virginia
18. Foster Hall, Talladega College, Talladega, Alabama
19. John W. Boddie House, Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, Mississippi
20. African Zion Baptist Church, West Virginia State University, Institute, West Virginia
21. Administration Building, Xavier University, New Orleans, Louisiana