Superintendent's Compendium, 2017

National Park Service Olympic National Park 600 East Park Avenue

U.S. Department of the Interior Port Angeles, Washington

98362

Superintendent’s Compendium Of

Designations, Closures, Permit 360-565-3000

Requirements and Other Restrictions 360-565-3015 fax

Imposed Under Discretionary Authority.

Approved:

/s/ M. Sarah Creachbaum

Superintendent

Date: _________________________


In accordance with regulations and the delegated authority provided in Title 36, Code of Federal Regulations (“36 CFR”), Chapter 1, Parts 1-7, authorized by Title 54 USC sec. 100101 (a), the following provisions apply to all lands and waters administered by the National Park Service, within the boundaries of Olympic National Park. Unless otherwise stated, these regulatory provisions apply in addition to the requirements contained in 36 CFR, Chapter 1, Parts 1-7.

Written determinations, which explain the reasoning behind the Superintendent’s use of discretionary

authority, as required by Section 1.5(c), appear in this document identified by italicized print.

I. 36 CFR §1.5 – VISITING HOURS, PUBLIC USE LIMITS, CLOSURES, AND AREA

DESIGNATIONS FOR SPECIFIC USE OR ACTIVITIES

(a)(1) The following visiting hours and public use limits are established for all or for the listed portions of the park, and the following closures are established for all or a portion of the park to all public use or to a certain use or activity:

Public Use Limits

  • The following areas are subject to overnight camping limits during the period January 1 through December 31. Self-registration is not authorized in these areas:

Flapjack Lakes/Gladys Divide

Lake Constance

Royal Creek Trail (from park boundary to Upper Royal Basin)

Grand Valley Area (from Obstruction Point Trailhead to Grand Pass including the Badger Valley Primitive Trail, Grand Lake, Moose Lake, Gladys Lake, Grand Pass and Cross-Country Grand Valley & Lillian Lake)

Deer Park to Obstruction Point (Roaring Winds Campsite)

Seven Lakes Basin & High Divide Loop area including the Sol Duc River Trail, High Divide Trail, Cat Basin Primitive Trail, Seven Lakes Basin, Deer Lake Trail, Mink Lake Trail, Little Divide Trail and Swimming Bear Lake (AKA Cat Lake)

Ozette Loop Area (from Yellow Banks north to Father & Son)

Hoh Lake Trail (Jct. of Hoh River Trail to junction of High Divide Trail)

Upper Lena Lake

Hoh River Trail from Martin Creek Camp to Glacier Meadows

Determining Factors: These areas receive a great deal of use and permits are required to reduce visitor conflicts and impacts to the natural resources. The Organic Act, the Endangered Species Act and the Wilderness Act require the NPS to actively protect the natural and cultural resources and associated aesthetic values of these areas.

  • Landing of motorized watercraft on ocean shorelines in Olympic National Park from the north bank of the Hoh River to the boundary with the Makah Indian Reservation (including the coastal strip islands and reefs), is prohibited except in emergencies or for administrative purposes as approved by the park.

Determining Factors: These areas are primarily wilderness and motorized vessels adversely impact the resource and visitor experience.

  • Willfully remaining or approaching, photographing, filming or video recording within 50 yards of bears, elk, mountain goats or cougars, or of any other wildlife or nesting birds, or within any distance which disturbs or displaces wildlife or nesting birds is prohibited.

Determining Factors: These rules are necessary to protect people from wildlife and to keep wildlife from becoming habituated to human presence.

  • Failing to remove one’s self to the prescribed distances (50 yards) during inadvertent or casual encounters with wildlife is prohibited.

Determining Factors: These rules are necessary to protect people from wildlife and to keep wildlife from becoming habituated to human presence.

Closures

  • Park Facilities:

The following areas and facilities are closed to public use:

Park administrative, maintenance, operations, storage, and employee housing facilities, including but not limited to access roads, outbuildings, grounds, and docks. This closure shall not apply to residents, guests of residents, or persons engaged in legitimate Government activities or permitted business activities.

Except for facilities designated for visitor use, all buildings are closed and secured to unauthorized entry. This shall not apply to persons in non-public areas who have been granted specific permission by the National Park Service (NPS) or another authorized Federal agency, licensed concessionaires or their representatives, or those who are under escort of park employees acting within the scope of employment.

Determining Factors: In order to provide security for government facilities for which visitors have no need to access, these limits will address vandalism and theft issues.

  • Overnight use of the following backcountry structures is prohibited except in emergencies:

The Trapper Shelter, 12 Mile Shelter, Low Divide Shelter and Enchanted Valley Shelter in the Quinault.

The Pelton Creek Shelter in the Queets.

The Happy Four Shelter, Olympus Guard Shelter, Elk Lake, and Glacier Meadows Shelter in the Hoh.

Sol Duc Falls shelter in the Sol Duc.

Toleak Shelter at Toleak Point.

Determining Factors: Based on the Backcountry Management Plan these structures are managed with the intention that they would be used in emergency situations only.

Michael's Cabin, Humes Cabin, and Remanns Cabin in the Elwha.

The Spotters Cabin on Pyramid Peak at Lake Crescent.

Determining Factors: These are historic structures. It is not possible to supervise the public in these areas and damage to the historic structures would result.

  • From Thanksgiving weekend to the last weekend in March, Hurricane Ridge Road from the Heart O’ The Hills gate to the Hurricane Ridge parking Lot to include Obstruction Point is closed to motorized vehicles and public use Tuesday through Thursday and non-Holiday Mondays.

Determining Factors: This closure is necessary because the cost of opening the road for weekday access is an inequitable allocation of facilities for the number of visitors it benefits. A two year pilot study was conducted over the winters of 2010-11 and 2011-12 during which the road was open for the mid-week days as well as for the weekend. The results of the experiment did not support continuing mid-week access as visitation was small and the cost was excessive to keep the road open.

Because the road is not plowed consistently during this time, it is not safe for visitors to drive on the road due to snow and ice buildup.

Travel above the tunnels during the winter season is closed to skiers, hikers and bicyclists when plowing /road clearing operations are underway.

  • The Deer Park Road is closed to motorized public vehicle use at the park boundary from the period of mid-September to mid-June (exact dates will be publicized by the park each year).

Determining Factors: This closure is necessary because the cost of keeping the road open during the winter is an inequitable allocation of facilities for the number of visitors it benefits. Because the road is not plowed consistently during this time, it is not safe for visitors to drive on the road due to snow and ice buildup. Dates are determined by season ending and season opening weather events.

  • Underwater diving in the area known as Meldrim Point (also known as Ambulance Point) at Lake Crescent is allowed by permit only. This area begins at the eastern edge of the prominent point of land adjacent to the highway pullout at mile post 222.7, continues 600 feet eastward along the shoreline, and extends out 200 from shore. Diving in this area is prohibited except as authorized by permit from the Superintendent.

Determining Factors: the area is closed to protect human remains.

  • The use of compression or “jake brakes” is prohibited.

Determining Factors: Noise exhibited by this type of braking system is inconsistent with park values and visitor use objectives. The noise levels of these trucks consistently exceed a noise level of 60 decibels measured on the A-weight scale at fifty feet.

  • The parking lot at the Port Angeles Visitor Center is closed to parking after dark.

Determining Factors: This parking lot has a history of after hour illegal activity.

  • Park wilderness, including trails, is closed to the possession or use of any machine, conveyance, device or vehicle activated and propelled by a motor, engine, or other non-living power source for the preservation of wilderness character. This includes, but is not limited to, cars, trucks, all-terrain vehicles (ATV), motorcycles, aircraft, snow machines, motorboats, chain saws, weed whackers, power drills, power saws, generators, compressors, windmills or turbines, and snow or leaf blowers.

Determining Factors: The Wilderness Act of 1964 prohibits these uses in designated wilderness. Allowing such use would place the park in violation of the Wilderness Act.

  • Park wilderness, including trails, is closed to the possession or use of any contrivance for moving people or material in or over land, water, snow or air that has moving parts, that provides a mechanical advantage to the user, and is powered by a living or non-living power source for the preservation of wilderness character. This includes, but is not limited to, non-motorized wheeled vehicles, conveyances and devices, such as bicycles, Segways™ and other Electric Personal Assistance Mobility Devices (EPAMD), carts, game carriers, canoe dollies, wheel barrows, wagons, ski kites, hang gliders and paragliders. Wheelchairs as defined in Title V Section 507(c) of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) may be used by persons with disabilities.

Determining Factors: The Wilderness Act of 1964 prohibits these uses in designated wilderness. Allowing such use would place the park in violation of the Wilderness Act.

  • The Dosewallips Road is closed to motor vehicles (including ATV’s and motor cycles) from the park boundary to the Dosewallips Ranger Station

Determining Factors: The Dosewallips Road is closed by a road washout outside the park boundary which makes vehicle travel unsafe and inappropriate on this road.

  • Launching, landing, or operating an unmanned aircraft from or on lands and waters administered by the National Park Service within the boundaries of Olympic National Park is prohibited except as approved in writing by the superintendent.

Determining Factors: The use of unmanned aircraft potentially presents unacceptable risks to visitors

(collisions between unmanned aircraft and visitors, the uncontrolled fall of unmanned aircraft, contact

with spinning propellers or rotors of unmanned aircraft.) These risks are greatest in the park’s non-

Wilderness areas, where the greatest concentrations of visitors are found.

The use of unmanned aircraft adversely impacts visitor experience by negatively affecting scenic and natural sound opportunities, and by potentially interfering with terrestrial and avian wildlife.

The use of motorized equipment is also prohibited in designated Wilderness; approximately 95% of park lands are designated Wilderness.

A full prohibition of UAV use within Olympic National Park is necessary in order to prevent potential risks to visitors, impacts to visitor experience and impacts to wilderness character.

Additionally, the unregulated use of unmanned aircraft would potentially violate several other regulations in Title 36 of the Code of Federal Regulations, including 2.2 Frightening Wildlife, 2.12 Creating an Audio Disturbance, 2.17 – Delivering or Retrieving an Object by Airborne Means, 2.34 – Making Unreasonable Noise, 2.34 – Creating or Maintaining a Hazardous Conditions, and 5.13 – Creating or Maintaining a Nuisance.

  • Rinsing vessels of saltwater residue to include bilges in freshwater lakes and rivers is prohibited

Determining Factors: Introduction of salt and other contaminants is detrimental to fresh water ecosystems.

(a)(2) The following areas have been designated for a specific use or activity, under the conditions and/or restrictions, as noted:

Hurricane Ridge Winter Use Area

  • All lands within the boundaries of Olympic National Park along the Hurricane Parkway, and within one mile of the Hurricane Ridge Road, the Hurricane Ridge parking area, Obstruction Point Road and the road and trail leading from the Hurricane Ridge Lodge to Hurricane Hill are designated as the Hurricane Ridge Winter Use Area, from Thanksgiving weekend through the last weekend in March.

  • Camping within the Hurricane Ridge Winter Use Area is prohibited within ½ mile of any trailhead.

  • Sledding, inner-tubing, and similar winter sports are prohibited in the Hurricane Ridge Winter Use Area except in designated areas. Only solid plastic or inflatable plastic sliding devices may be used, in order to prevent injury.

  • All winter users may only construct jumps made of snow.

  • During the winter use season, it is required that all visitors register for all cross country ski or snowshoe trips starting in or passing through the Hurricane Ridge Winter Use Area except for naturalist guided tours. Visitors must register at the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center for day use activities, and at the Wilderness Information Center for overnight use.

  • Within 1/2 mile of the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center, visitors shall remain on designated nature trails except during the winter use season.

  • Unless otherwise posted during the winter use season all vehicles in the Hurricane Ridge Winter Use Area must be below the gate at Heart O' The Hills by 1700 hours (5:00 PM).

  • Due to public safety concerns the Hurricane Ridge Road may be closed at the Heart O’ The Hills entrance based on environmental conditions at any time.

  • All vehicles must carry approved traction control devices, when traveling above the Heart O' the Hills entrance station, from November 1 through April 1. Law Enforcement rangers may prohibit any vehicle from driving above the Heart O’ the Hills entrance station, when it is determined that the vehicle may experience difficulty in safely traveling the area. This requirement may be waived by the ranger on duty if conditions allow.

  • When the ranger on duty has determined that traction devices are required, all vehicles must have approved traction devices on a set of drive tires. Refer to definitions section for traction devices definitions.

All swimming and bathing activities:

  • Swimming farther than 50 yards from the Lake Crescent and Lake Ozette shoreline is prohibited except in the company of a vessel within 10 yards of the swimmer. This determination is for the safety of swimmers to be seen by other vessels.

II. 36 CFR §1.6 – ACTIVITIES THAT REQUIRE A PERMIT

(f) The following is a compilation of those activities for which a permit from the superintendent is required:

  • §1.5(a)(1) Diving in Lake Crescent in the vicinity of Meldrim point

  • §2.4(d) Carry or possess a weapon, trap, or net (excluding firearms carried in accordance with

Washington State Law

  • §2.4(d) Weapons carrying permit (excluding firearms carried in accordance with Washington State Law)

  • §2.5(a) Specimen collection (Take plant, fish, wildlife, rocks or minerals)

  • §2.10(a) Backcountry camping (also known as Backcountry Use Permit)

  • §2.12 Audio Disturbances

  • §2.12 (a)(2) Operating a chain saw in developed areas, excluding in-holders private property

  • §2.12 (a)(3) Operation of any type of portable motor or engine, or device powered by a portable motor or engine in non-developed areas

  • §2.12 (a)(4) Operation of a public address system in connection with a public gathering or special event for which a permit has been issued pursuant to §2.50 or §2.51

  • §2.17(a)(3) Aircraft and air delivery

  • §2.17 (a)(3) Delivery/retrieval of a person/object by parachute, helicopter or other airborne means

  • §2.17 (c)(1) Removal of downed aircraft

  • §2.37 Soliciting or demanding gifts, money goods or services (Pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit issued under §2.50, §2.51 or §2.52)

  • §2.38 Explosives:

  • §2.38 (a) Use, possess, store, transport explosives, blasting agents

  • §2.38 (b) Use or possess fireworks

  • §2.50(a) Conduct a sports event, pageant, regatta, public spectator attraction, entertainment, ceremony, and similar events

  • §2.51(a) Public assemblies, meetings, gatherings, demonstrations, parades and other public expressions of views for groups of more than 25 people.

  • §2.52(c) Sale or distribution of printed matter that is not solely commercial advertising

  • §2.60(b) Livestock use

  • §2.61(a)Residing on federal lands

  • §2.62 Memorialization:

  • §2.62 (a) Erection of monuments (Requires approval from Regional Director)

  • §2.62 (b) Scattering ashes from human cremation

  • §3.5(c) Boating Vessel Reporting and removal

  • §4.11(a) Exceeding of established vehicle load, weight and size limits

  • §5.1- Display, posting or distribution of advertisements

  • §5.2(b) Sale of intoxicants on private lands.

  • §5.3 Engaging in or soliciting any business (Requires a permit, contract or other written agreement with the United States, or must be pursuant to special regulations).

  • §5.5 Commercial Photography/Filming:

  • §5.5 (a) all commercial filming requires a permit other than bona fide newsreel or news television

  • §5.5 (b) Still photography of vehicles, or other articles of commerce or models for the purpose of commercial advertisement.

  • §5.6(c) Use of commercial vehicles on park area roads (The superintendent shall issue a permit to access private lands within or adjacent to the park when access is otherwise not available)

  • §5.7 Construction of buildings, facilities, trails, roads, boat docks, path, structure, etc.

  • §6.9(a) Operation of a solid waste disposal site.

  • Any other permits required by state, county or other federal agencies (inquire at the Superintendent's

Office).

Part 7 Special Regulations

71.10 Special Recreation Permits and Special Recreation Permit Fees

  • The park has established a Special Public Use Fee for overnight use of the backcountry. All overnight visitors must obtain a Backcountry Use Permit, available at the Wilderness Information Center, some Ranger Stations or Visitor Centers and some trailheads.

III. GENERAL REGULATIONS

36 CFR §2.1 – PRESERVATION OF NATURAL, CULTURAL AND ARCHEOLOGICAL RESOURCES

(a)(1)(ii) The following is prohibited - Possessing, injuring, defacing, removing, digging, or

disturbing from its natural state plants or the parts or products thereof.

  • Visitors are prohibited from using any type of equipment to assist them in climbing trees in

Olympic National Park.

(a)(4) Dead wood on the ground may be collected for use as fuel for campfires within the park in the following areas:

  • In frontcountry areas dead and down wood, no larger than four inches in diameter, may be gathered within ¼ mile of campgrounds except where fires are prohibited or in areas with a designated firewood concession.

  • In backcountry areas under 3500’ and not in prohibited locations (see 36 CFR 2.13 designated areas)

  • Driftwood, 12” in diameter or less, may be collected from the beach for firewood at South Beach and Kalaloch Campgrounds. It must be used in those campgrounds and not removed from the park.

  • See 36 CFR 2.13 for prohibited areas.

(c)(2)(i), (c)(2)(iii) The following fruits, nuts, berries or unoccupied seashells may be gathered by hand for personal use or consumption, in accordance with the noted size, quantity, collection sites and/or use or consumption restrictions:

  • Edible fruits, berries, nuts and the fruiting bodies of mushrooms may be collected by hand for personal consumption except within 200 ft. of nature trails, special trails and natural study areas. The total quantity of edible fruits, berries, mushrooms or nuts that may be possessed is limited to

1 quart per person per day. For cranberries and native black berries in the Ozette prairie area, located in Township 31 N., Range 16 W., Sections 25 and 26, the collection limit is 3 ½ gallons, which may only be collected once in a two week period.

Exotic species (apples, pears, and non-native blackberries) are exempt from the daily possession limits.

  • The collection of unoccupied seashells on the ocean beaches is limited to a handful per person per park visit.

Determining Factors: Limited consumption of these resources does not adversely affect the reproduction of either the plants or the wildlife food source. If future monitoring indicates that such gathering or consumption is likely to cause adverse effects to park resources, then the authorization of this consumptive use will be terminated. Because of the difficulty of reaching the Ozette prairie collection areas, the limits have been set to accommodate a trip to that area once in a two week period. Use of these items for any purpose other than personal consumption is specifically prohibited.





36 CFR §2.2 - WILDLIFE PROTECTION

(d) The transporting of lawfully taken wildlife through the park is permitted under the following conditions and procedures:

  • Wildlife taken lawfully outside of Olympic National Park may be transported through the Park, in a vehicle or covered in an open bed pickup, on the following Park roads only, stopping while enroute is prohibited except for emergencies.

Heart O' the Hills Parkway to the intersection with the Little River Road

U.S. 101 at Lake Crescent

Camp David Junior Road at Lake Crescent

East Beach Road at Lake Crescent

Lyre River Road at Lake Crescent

Boundary Creek Road at Lake Crescent

USFS Road No. 2918 at Sol Duc

LaPush Road at Mora

K-1000 Road at Kalaloch

RY-1430 Road at Ruby Beach

RY-1324 at Kalaloch

Hoko Road at Ozette

North Shore Road at Quinault to include Viewpoint Lane, Lakeview Drive, Hemlock Way, Shari Lane.

Four Stream Road at Staircase

Clark Spur Road at Quinault

South Shore Road at Quinault

  • Hunters accessing adjacent lands and boundaries outside the Park via Park land may not transport legally taken wildlife back through the Park except as noted above.

(e) The following areas are closed to the viewing of wildlife with the use of an artificial light:

  • Use of an artificial light for purposes of viewing wildlife is prohibited in all areas of Olympic

National Park.

  • Spotlights, thermograph instruments, electronic instruments, chemical tagging or any means that is intended to artificially enhance one’s ability to view, detect, or monitor wildlife in low-light conditions is prohibited.

36 CFR §2.3 – FISHING

(a) The following State fishing laws and/or regulations, as noted, do not apply in the listed areas:

  • Within Olympic National Park the Annual Park Fishing Regulations are used to regulate fishing activities. Fishermen are responsible for knowing the regulations. These can be found at any Olympic National Park Ranger Station or Visitor Center and at the Olympic National Park website (nps.gov/olym).

  • All waters within Olympic National Park are closed to the removal of any species of fish, shellfish, aquatic plants, or wildlife except as provided in the Olympic National Park Fishing Regulations.

All waters open to fishing as described in the Fishing Regulations are only open from one hour before official sunrise to one hour after official sunset.





36 CFR §2.10 – CAMPING and FOOD STORAGE

(a) The sites and areas listed below have been designated for camping activities. A permit system has been established for certain campgrounds or camping activities, and conditions for camping and camping activities are in effect as noted:

Camping in Olympic National Park is subject to the following limitations:

  • General provisions: No person is permitted to camp within the Kalaloch Campground longer than 7 consecutive days during the reservation period. There is a 14 consecutive day limit in any campground (other than Kalaloch Campground) for the calendar year. There Is a 21 day limit for the calendar year in all Olympic National Park Campgrounds.

  • Camping is prohibited in areas being restored or re-vegetated when posted.

  • Holding or reserving a campsite for another party is prohibited. Sites may not be paid for by those who do not intend to occupy the site immediately. Sites for which required fees are not paid will be considered unoccupied and available for use. Sites may not be unattended for more than 24 hours.

  • No more than 8 persons per developed site are allowed, except at the Kalaloch Group Campsite and the Sol Duc Group Campsite.

  • Campground parking limits are as follows:

Staircase: 2 vehicles and 1 trailer per campsite.

Heart of the Hills, and Sol Duc: Two vehicles per campsite which must be parked fully on the asphalt parking space.

Fairholme: Two vehicles per campsite. Park vehicles with all wheels on the paved or gravel site

pad.

Ozette: Two vehicles per campsite.

Mora: Two vehicles or one recreational vehicle with towed car or one vehicle with trailer or four motorcycles per campsite. The vehicles must be parked on the paved or graveled campsite pad.

Hoh Campground: 2 vehicles per campsite which must be parked on pavement.

Kalaloch: 2 vehicles per campsite. Vehicles must be parked within designated parking areas.

Graves Creek and North Fork Campgrounds: Two vehicles per site.

  • Groups camping in the park backcountry are limited to a maximum of 12 persons per group. Affiliated groups whose combined total number of people is greater than 12 must camp and travel at least one mile apart.

  • In the following backcountry areas, groups of 7 to 12 people are prohibited to camp except in sites designated as "Group Camps"; all areas enclosed by the Deer Lake Trail, High Divide Trail and Sol Duc River Trails; Hoh Lake Trail, Hoh River Trail, Grand Lake, Moose Lake, Gladys Lake, Royal Lake, Upper Lena Lake and Lake Constance; in the forested area of Sand Point and Flapjack Lakes/Gladys Divide.

  • Camping is prohibited on the Elwha Project Lands.

  • Camping is prohibited within one mile of any trailhead except as noted above.

  • Camping is prohibited in the following backcountry areas:

Rialto Beach south of Ellen Creek.

Entire length of the Second Beach Trail.

Within 1/4 mile of Scout Lake.

Between Glacier Meadows Ranger Station and Cal Tech Rocks (between Glacier Meadows and the end of the trail at the lateral moraine and on the lower blue glacier below the ice fall). (Cal Tech rocks are open to camping).

Within ¼ mile of Lake Mary and Lake Margaret.

  • Except in designated campsites, camping is prohibited within 1/4 mile of the following:

Hoh Lake, Elk Lake in the Hoh district, Glacier Meadows Ranger Station, Lake Crescent, Olympic

Hot Springs, Grand Lake, Moose Lake, Gladys Lake, Lake Constance, Upper Lena Lake, Flapjack Lakes/Gladys Divide. Royal Lake, CB Flats, and Hoh Lake to Bogachiel Peak.

  • Except in designated campsites, camping is prohibited in the following areas:

The Queets corridor downstream from the trailhead to the park boundary and all areas on the coastal strip south of the Hoh Indian Reservation.

  • Camping aboard a vessel on park waters is prohibited.

(a) The following conditions are established for backcountry use permits:

  • Backcountry permits shall be surrendered for inspection upon request to any identified employee, official volunteer or member of the Student Conservation Association of the National Park Service.

  • Only one backcountry permit may be issued to a "permit holder" representing themselves, a party, or group. The permit must be in the possession of the permit holder at all times while in the backcountry. Multiple permits for one permit holder for the same time period are not allowed.

(b)(3) Camping within 25 feet of a fire hydrant or main road, or within 100 feet of a flowing stream, river or body of water is authorized only in the following areas, under the conditions noted:

  • Camping within 100 feet of a flowing stream, river or body of water is permitted only in established frontcountry and backcountry sites, on river bars in backcountry areas, and those sections of beach and adjacent areas open to backcountry camping.

(d) Conditions for the storage of food are in effect, as noted, for the following areas:

  • All of Olympic National Park is designated as a secure food storage area. In addition to other provisions of 2.10(d), any scented or odorous items must also be similarly stored. Suspended food must be a minimum of 12 feet from the ground and 10 feet horizontally from any fixed object. If this is not possible, use of bear resistant food containers is required.

  • Park approved animal resistant food containers ("bear canisters"), capable of preventing access by wildlife are required in the following areas: Royal Basin area from the Lower Meadow (.75miles below Royal Lake) to and including Upper Royal Basin and Deception Basin; Sol Duc River drainage/Seven Lakes Basin High Divide Loop area to include all camps adjacent to and enclosed by the Deer Lake Trail, High Divide Trail, Lunch Lake Trail, Sol Duc River Trail, Mink Lake Trail, East High Divide Trail, Cat Basin Way Trail, Swimming Bear Lake (AKA Cat Lake), Enchanted Valley and the wilderness coast (Hoh River to north boundary at Shi-Shi). All food, garbage and scented items must be properly stored in an approved bear canister at all times.

36 CFR 2.13 – FIRES

(a)(1) The lighting or maintaining of fires is generally prohibited, except as provided for in the following designated areas or receptacles, and under the conditions noted:

Designated Areas:

  • Fires may be kindled in provided grates and grills in developed frontcountry campgrounds and picnic areas only. On the ocean beaches fires may not be kindled closer than 10 feet to the nearest beach logs, fires may not exceed 3 feet in diameter.

  • Where a designated "campfire site" is provided, no other fire is permitted within 1/4 mile.

  • Open fires are prohibited on the Elwha Project Lands.

  • Open fires are prohibited in the following backcountry areas:

The South Ozette Loop quota area (the headland at Wedding Rocks south to the Headland at the north end of Yellow Bank).

Parkwide above 3500’ elevation.

Olympic Hot Springs area including Boulder Creek campground.

All the area from 1/4 mile north of Elk Lake (Martin Creek) to, and including, Glacier

Meadows and above to include the lateral moraine/Blue Glacier.

The entire length of the Skyline Trail and the Big Creek Trail from one mile below Three

Lakes.

  • In the following areas, fires are permitted in the provided fire rings only:

Low Divide from Marmot Meadow north to Low Divide Summit.

Park boundary at Rialto Beach north to Ellen Creek.

Established Conditions for Fires:

  • A written burn permit is required to conduct any natural vegetation debris burning of piles larger than 4’ X 4’ X 3’, within the boundaries of Olympic National Park, regardless of land ownership, between May 1 and October 30. Between November 1 until April 30, private landowners must contact the Fire Management Office and speak with Fire Personnel that they will be burning a pile, if larger than 4’ X 4’ X 3’.

  • Any park employee or private landowner located within the boundary of Olympic National Park who wishes to burn a pile of natural vegetation larger than 4’ X 4’ X 3’, must contact the Fire Management Office, at least 3 days prior to the burn.

  • Private landowners located within the boundaries of Olympic National Park may conduct debris burns that are 4' X 4' X 3' or less within a fire pit, as well as conduct recreation burns (campfires, burn pits or outdoor fireplaces) in established fire rings/fireplaces at any time and do not require a permit, unless a specific fire ban restricts or stops all outdoor burning. A person must remain on site until the fire is extinguished.

  • During episodes of high fire danger, or other periods that the park has placed a burn ban into effect, all outdoor burning, campfires, use of woodstoves and fireplaces, as well as smoking outdoors, may be restricted or stopped as necessary to provide for fire safety. Land clearing burns (i.e., clearing of forested areas to construct a new building) are managed under the Washington Department of Ecology regulations and require a permit from the Fire Management Office (as well as other park clearances).

  • The following types of materials may be burned: Only natural vegetation may be burned in a burn pile.

  • The following types of materials may not be burned:

Rubber products, plastics, asphalt, garbage, dead animals, petroleum products, painted

lumber, plywood, paints or similar materials that emit dense smoke or create offensive odors when burned.

(a)(2) The following restrictions are in effect for the use of stoves or lanterns:

  • The use of stoves, which consume natural fuels, such as wood or twigs, are not permitted within areas where open fires are prohibited.

(c) The Superintendent may close all or a portion of a park area to the lighting and maintaining of fires.

  • During episodes of high fire danger, or other periods that the state or park has placed a burn ban in effect, all outdoor burning, use of woodstoves and fireplaces, and smoking, may be restricted or stopped.

36 CFR §2.14 – SANITATION and REFUSE

(b) Conditions for the disposal, containerization, or carryout of human body waste have been established for the following:

  • In non-developed areas human body waste must be disposed of in provided privies and nowhere else within 1/4 mile of such privies.

  • In areas beyond 1/4 mile of a privy, human body waste must be buried in organic soil in an area not frequented by the public and not visible from trails, campsites or developed areas.

  • When traveling over extensive snow fields or in the winter when organic soil is not exposed, solid human body waste must be buried 200 yards out of any campsite or off of any established travel route to a depth of two feet except for the climbing routes on the Blue Glacier where human fecal waste will be packed out in accordance with the waste removal policy.

36 CFR §2.15 – PETS

(a)(1) The following structures and/or areas are closed to the possession of pets:

  • Dogs (except certified ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990) service animals), cats and other pets are prohibited in park non-developed areas including trails or beaches except in those locations identified below, they must be leashed at all times:

Rialto Beach from the parking lot 1/2 mile north to Ellen Creek and all beach access from the Hoh

Indian Reservation south to the Quinault Indian Reservation.

The July Creek Loop Trail

The Elwha Project Lands and the Peabody Creek Trail.

The Olympic Discovery Trail as it passes through the Lake Crescent District of the park.

The Madison Falls Trail.

(a)(5) Pet excrement must be disposed in accordance with the following conditions:

  • Pet excrement must be immediately collected and disposed of in the nearest trash receptacle.

36 CFR §2.16 – HORSES and PACK ANIMALS (Stock)

(a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of

transporting equipment is prohibited.

  • “Pack Animals” are designated as horses, burros, mules or llamas.

(b) The use of stock is allowed on the following trails, routes or areas:

Hood Canal area: Dosewallips Road from the park boundary to the main trailhead.

Quinault area: The Graves Creek and North Fork Roads.

Kalaloch area: The Queets Road from the Park boundary east to the Queets Trail.

Elwha area: The Upper Elwha River Road from the Park boundary south to its junction with the Whiskey Bend Road. The Whiskey Bend Road from its junction with the upper Elwha River road south to the Whiskey Bend Trailhead. The junction of Whiskey Bend Road to Altaire Campground and Happy Lake Trailhead to Appleton Pass Trailhead via Olympic Hot Springs Road.

Lake Crescent area: Camp David Jr. Road from Pyramid Mountain Trailhead to Spruce Railroad

Trailhead. Boundary Creek Road from Lyre River area to the Park boundary and Waterline Road from the Lyre River area to the Park boundary.

(b) Stock are allowed anywhere except the following trails:

Parkwide: All trails designated as Nature Trails.

Quinault area: Wynoochee Trail, Sundown Lake Trail, Graves Creek Trail, Big Creek Trail, Elip

Creek Trail, O'Neil Pass Trail, Skyline Trail, and Martin's Park Trail.

Kalaloch area: All beaches and beach access trails south of the Hoh Indian Reservation.

Hoh area: The section of the Hoh Trail above Martin's Creek stock camp is closed to horses, mules, and burros.

Mora and Ozette areas: All beaches and beach access trails north of the Hoh River including

the boardwalk trails between the Ozette Ranger Station and the coastline.

Lake Crescent and Sol Duc areas: Barnes Creek Trail, Sol Duc Campground Trail, Eagle

Lakes Trail, Aurora Creek Trail, Lunch Lake Trail, Pyramid Peak Trail and Mt. Storm King Trail.
Elwha and Hurricane Area: Hurricane Hill Trail, Madison Falls Trail, Griff Creek Trail, Cascade Rock Trail, .4 Mile Lake Mills Trail, West Lake Mills Trail, Elwha Campground Loop Trail, and Olympic Hot Springs Trail from the Boulder Creek Bridge to the Hot Springs, Royal Basin Trail.
Hood Canal area: Wagonwheel Lake Trail, Upper Lena Lake Trail, Putvin Primitive Trail, Lake Constance Trail, Flapjack Lakes Trail, Six Ridge Primitive Trail, Mt. Anderson Glacier Trail, Black and White Primitive Trail, Rapids Loop/Four Stream Trail on the west side of the North Fork Skokomish River, and the South Fork Skokomish Trail.

2.16 (g) Other conditions concerning the use of stock:

  • Camping with stock is limited to the designated stock camps in the following areas:

Hood Canal areas; North Fork Skokomish River - Camp Pleasant, Nine-Stream; Duckabush River – Ten Mile, Upper Duckabush; Dosewallips River - Diamond Meadows, Bear Camp, Big Timber, Deception Creek,

Hoh area: Hoh River Drainage excluding the South Fork Hoh - 5-Mile Island, Lewis Meadow, Martin Creek

Sol Duc area: Sol Duc drainage south of the Eagle Ranger Station - Horse Head, Cat Basin,

Deer Lake (llamas only).

  • Camping with pack animals outside designated stock camps is prohibited on trails above 3500’.

  • Backcountry user groups are limited to a maximum of eight stock animals per user group.

  • Stock animals are not permitted to travel off maintained trails above 3500’, except between the

stock fences at Low Divide.

  • The use of loose hay, grain or any other type of stock food containing viable seeds is prohibited.

  • Pack animal users are required to carry certified weed free supplemental food on all overnight

trips.

  • Leaving pack animals unattended for more than 24 hours is prohibited.

  • Grazing is permitted within ¼ mile of stock camps. When grazing stock, animals are restrained through the use of hobbles, highlines, or picket stakes animals must be moved every 12 hours or sooner if requested to do so by an authorized person.

  • Tying of stock to single trees for more than one hour, or tying to trees smaller than eight inches in diameter is prohibited.

  • Destruction of stock in the backcountry:

  • Olympic Dispatch Center (360)565-3115 must be notified as soon as possible of stock incidents.

  • Must not involve any chemical that will cause secondary poisoning to any other wildlife. Dead stock must be moved at least 300 feet from trails and campsites, within 72 hours.

36 CFR §2.21 – SMOKING

(a) The following portions of the park, or all or portions of buildings, structures or facilities are closed to smoking:

  • Smoking is prohibited in all concessions public areas and any other area within concession facilities so designated by "No Smoking" signs.

Determining Factors: These restrictions are intended to reduce any possible conflict between users and the harmful effects of second hand smoke and to protect park resources. This includes electronic nicotine delivery systems pursuant to DO-50D and Policy Memo 15-03

  • Per Federal regulations smoking is prohibited in all government buildings. This does not include non-shared government quarters.

    36 CFR §2.22 – PROPERTY

    (a)(2) Property may be left unattended for periods longer than 24 hours in the following areas and under the following conditions:

  • Motor vehicles may be parked unattended at trailheads and boat launch facilities when the vehicle operator is using the Park backcountry.

  • 36 CFR §2.35 – ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES and CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES

    (a)(3)(i) The following public use areas, portions of public use areas, and/or public facilities within the park are closed to consumption of alcoholic beverages, and/or to the possession of a bottle, can or other receptacle containing an alcoholic beverage that is open, or has been opened, or whose seal has been broken or the contents of which have been partially removed:

  • The parking lot, picnic area, beach, and swim areas of Fairholme boat launch, East Beach extending to the area known as Pirate’s Cove, North Shore Day Use area, and Bovee's Meadow OR in any concession areas and/or other areas within concession facilities so designated by “NO ALCOHOL AREA” signs.

  • The consumption of alcoholic beverages is prohibited within all ranger stations, visitor centers and government buildings, except residences, unless specifically allowed as part of a special event.

  • Determining Factors: These areas are closed as consumption of alcohol was deemed an inappropriate activity considering the other uses of these locations. Aberrant behavior related to the consumption of alcoholic beverages is of such magnitude that diligent supervision would be required. It is not possible to supervise the public on a constant basis in these areas, therefore the consumption of alcohol is prohibited.

    36 CFR §2.51 – DEMONSTRATIONS

    (a) Public assemblies, meetings, gatherings, demonstrations, parades and other public expressions of views:

  • As designated by the Superintendent, the following locations are available within the park for public assemblies:

  • The front lawn of the Quinault River Ranger Station

    The middle of the grassy island at the east end of the main parking lot of the Hoh Ranger Station.

    The Mora amphitheater

    The grass area just west of the main parking area at Ozette

    Bovee’s Meadow in the Lake Crescent area

    The grassy area north of the Olympic Park Visitor Center in Port Angeles, WA.

    Maps of these locations are available from the Superintendent’s Office at:

    Olympic National Park

    600 E Park Ave

    Port Angeles, WA 98362

    2.52 (c) Sale or distribution of printed matter that is not solely commercial advertising;

  • As designated by the Superintendent, the following locations are available within the park for sale or distribution of printed matter:

  • The Hale turnout area approximately 1 ½ miles from Highway 101 on the North Shore Road of

    Lake Quinault.

    The grassy island at the east end of the main parking lot of the Hoh Ranger Station.

    The Rialto Beach parking lot

    The courtyard between the Ozette Ranger Station and the Ozette information kiosk

    The Barnes Point/Storm King parking lot in the Lake Crescent area

    Within the immediate vicinity of the Elwha Ranger Station

    The grassy area north of the roadway and east of the sidewalk in front of the Olympic Park Visitor

    Center in Port Angeles, WA.

    Maps of these locations are available from the Superintendent’s Office at:

    Olympic National Park

    600 E Park Ave

    Port Angeles, WA 98362

    36 CFR §2.62 – MEMORIALIZATION

    (b) A permit is required for the scattering of ashes from cremated human remains, or in the following designated areas without a permit, in accordance with the following terms and conditions:

  • Permits are required for all areas for any type of memorialization to include scattering of ashes to reduce conflict between users and to protect the park resources.

  • 36 CFR §3.8 – PROHIBITED BOAT OPERATION

    (d)(1) Vessels may not create a wake or exceed 5 mph in the following areas:

  • On Lake Ozette within 100 yards of shore near the ranger station and campground as marked with signed buoys and within 50 yards of the shoreline

  • On Lake Crescent, within 100 yards of the shoreline adjacent to developed sites

  • 100 yards from shoreline in undeveloped areas.

  • Within log boom areas.

  • 36 CFR §3.9 – Personal Water Craft (PWC)

    (a) Personal water craft use is prohibited. PWC may be operated only in park areas authorized by special regulation.

    36 CFR §3.12 – WATER SKIING and SIMILAR ACTIVITIES

    (a) The towing of persons by vessels is allowed in the following areas under the terms and conditions noted:

  • The towing of persons by vessels is prohibited except on Lake Crescent and Lake Ozette.

  • 36 CFR §3.16 – SWIMMING or WADING –

    See 36 CFR 1.5(a)(2)

    36 CFR §3.17- REGULATIONS for SWIMMING AREAS & BEACHES

    (c) The superintendent may prohibit the use or possession of flotation devices, glass containers, kites, or incompatible activities in swimming areas or beaches in accordance with § § 1.5 1.7 of this chapter.

  • The possession or use of glass containers of any type is prohibited within designated swimming areas.

  • 36 CFR §3.18 – SNORKELING / DIVING

    (a) SCUBA diving and snorkeling is permitted in the following swimming, docking, and mooring areas under the terms and conditions noted:

  • The East Beach swimming area from October 1 through May 1.

  • 36 CFR §4.21 – SPEED LIMITS

    (b) The following routes have speed limits designated by the Superintendent:

    The justification for each road’s speed limit is listed in italics under the road description.

  • 5 MPH

  • Hoko/Ozette Rd Mile 19.7 to 20.7 (washout)

    There is a wash out/one lane road with traffic control signs at this spot.

    South Beach CG

    No designated roadway in the campground with limited visibility and significant pedestrian traffic

  • 10 MPH

  • Staircase Campground

    Campground road with limited visibility and significant pedestrian traffic

    Fairholme Campground

    Campground road with limited visibility and significant pedestrian traffic

    Sol Duc Campground

    Campground road with limited visibility and significant pedestrian traffic

    Hoh Road east bound Visitor Parking Area

    There is congestion from vehicles coming from different directions and a lack of visibility approaching parking lot.

    Kalaloch Campground

    Campground road with limited visibility and significant pedestrian traffic

  • 15 MPH

  • Whiskey Bend Road

    This is a narrow dirt road with limited sight visibility.

    Camp David Jr. Road Hwy 101 to Campground

    This is a congested area with a store and campground and boat launching area

    Sol Duc Road Mile 11.5 to Campground loop B

    Road is very narrow in a highly congested area due to ranger station and Sol Duc Resort.

    Pedestrians on road.

  • 20 MPH

  • Hoko/Ozette Rd Mile 20.7 to Mile 21

    Congestion due to residences, campground, and parking.

    Hoh Road west bound 300 feet east and west of Entrance Station

    Severe congestion, entrance station stop

  • 25 MPH

  • Staircase Road Entrance Station to Campground and Housing area

    Narrow road with pedestrian traffic from the campground, ranger station, and housing area.

    Hurricane Ridge Rd Entrance Station area

    Entrance Station area with pedestrians and campground entrance.

    Olympic Hot Springs Road Boundary to Hot Springs Trailhead

    Pullouts and pedestrians along the road and narrow roadway (mostly gravel) with limited sight

    distance and wildlife and pedestrians on the road.

    East Beach Road

    Narrow winding road through residential area with no shoulders and pedestrians and bikes on road.

    Camp David Jr. Road Campground to Spruce RR Trailhead - West

    Narrow winding road through residential area with no shoulders and pedestrians and bikes on road.

    Sol Duc Road Hwy 101 Junction to Entrance Station

    Approach to entrance station, pedestrians on road.

    Sol Duc Road Campground Loop B to Sol Duc Trailhead

    Narrow road with limited sight distance and pedestrians on road.

    Mora Road 200 yds. before ranger Station to 100 yds. from Rialto beach

    Congested area with ranger station, and campground. Narrow road to beach.

    Hoh Road east bound Mile 5.7 to Visitor Parking Area

    The road is in congested area with pedestrian, wildlife and no sidewalks.

    Lower Queets Rd From Mile 0.2 East to End

    Road is gravel, narrow, and one lane with no shoulder and pedestrians.

    North Shore Road/E Mile 8.1 to North Shore Road -North Fork Road Intersection

    Narrow roadway with limited sight distance and wildlife and pedestrians on the road.

    North Shore Road/E Mile 0.3 to 3.1

    Narrow roadway with limited sight distance and wildlife and pedestrians on the road.

    North Shore Road/W Mile 3.1 to 1.2

    Narrow roadway with limited sight distance and wildlife and pedestrians on the road.

    South Shore Road

    Narrow winding roadway with no shoulder as well as pedestrians and wildlife along road

    North Fork Road

    Narrow winding roadway with no shoulder as well as pedestrians and wildlife along road

    Graves Creek Rd

    Narrow winding roadway with no shoulder as well as pedestrians and wildlife along road

    Lake View Lane

    Residential road with limited sight distance and pedestrians.

    Upper Queets Road

    Narrow winding roadway with no shoulder as well as pedestrians and wildlife along road


  • 35 MPH

  • Hurricane Ridge Rd Mile 3.6 to just north of entrance station

    This is a narrow curving road with limited sight distance, view overlook pullouts and significant wildlife along the shoulders. There is significant bike use on the road.

    Hurricane Ridge Rd Just south of entrance Station to end of road

    This is a narrow curving road with limited sight distance, rocks on the road and significant wildlife along the shoulders. There is significant bike use on the road.

    US Highway 101 Miles 221 – 230

    The road is narrow with many curves and a significant history of accidents, many of which have resulted in drowning’s in Lake Crescent.

    Sol Duc Road Entrance Station to Mile 11.5

    Narrow road with curves and limited sight distances.

    Hoko/Ozette Rd Boundary to Mile 19.7

    Narrow road with curves and limited sight distances.

    Swan Bay Rd Boundary to End of Road

    Narrow road ending in parking/lot boat ramp

    Mora Road Boundary to 200 yds. Before Ranger Station

    Narrow road with pedestrians and bikes.

    Hoh Road east bound Boundary to 300 feet west of Entrance Station

    Narrow winding road with limited sight distance.

    Hoh Road west bound Visitor Parking Area to Entrance Station

    Narrow winding road with limited sight distance

    Hoh Road west bound 300 feet east of Entrance Station to Mile 5.7

    Narrow winding road with limited sight distance

    North Shore Road/E Boundary to Mile 0.3

    Narrow gravel winding roadway with no shoulder, pedestrians and wildlife.

    North Shore Road/E Mile 3.1 to 8.1

    Narrow gravel winding roadway with no shoulder, pedestrians and wildlife.

    North Shore Road/W Mile 1.2 to park boundary

    Narrow gravel winding roadway with no shoulder, pedestrians and wildlife.

  • 55 MPH

  • US Highway 101 Mile 231 to Boundary

    The state of Washington controls this road and has determined this to be a safe speed.

    US Highway 101 Mile 158.0 to Boundary

    The state of Washington controls this road and has determined this to be a safe speed.

  • 60 MPH

  • US Highway 101 Sol Duc Road turn-off to Fairholme Campground Junction

    The state of Washington controls this road and has determined this to be a safe speed.

    US Highway 101 Kalaloch Boundary to Mile 156.7

    The state of Washington controls this road and has determined this to be a safe speed.

    36 CFR §4.30 – BICYCLES

    (a) The following additional routes, in developed areas or special use zones, have been designated for bicycle use:

  • Bicycle use is permitted on park roads, campground roads, parking areas and on the following designated routes:

  • Spruce Railroad Trail

    The Deer Park Road, Obstruction Point Road, and Hurricane Hill Road when closed to motorized vehicular traffic and plowing operations are not underway.

    The Dosewallips Road from the Boundary to the Dosewallips Ranger Station.

    Determining Factors: Historically this area was open to vehicle traffic. Use of this area by bicycles does not impact the natural, scenic or aesthetic values of the park.

    36 CFR §4.31 – HITCHHIKING

    (b) The following areas have been designated by the Superintendent as places where hitchhiking is allowed:

  • Visitor Center and trailhead parking lots throughout the park.

  • The Sunrise and Maggie’s pull outs on the Hurricane Ridge Road.

  • COMPENDIUM DEFINITIONS

    The following are designated as Nature Trails:

    Quinault area – July Creek Trail, Maple Glade Trail and Homestead Trail.

    Kalaloch/Queets area - Kalaloch Nature Trail and Sams River Loop Trail.

    Hoh area - Mini Trail, Hall of Mosses Trail and Spruce Trail.

    Mora area - James Pond Trail and Quillayute River Slough Trails.

    Lake Crescent/Sol Duc area - Fairholm Nature Trail, Marymere Falls Trail, Ancient Groves Nature Trail, Moments-in-Time Trail and Salmon Cascades Trail.

    Hurricane area - Big Meadows Trail, Cirque Rim Trail, Hurricane Hill Trail, High Ridge Trail and

    Rainshadow Trail.

    Staircase/Dosewallips area - Dosewallips Terrace Trail, Shady Lane Trail, Rapids Loop/Four Stream Trail on the west side of the North Fork Skokomish River Trail

    The following are designated as Special Trails:

    Kalaloch/Queets area - Kalaloch Beach Trails.

    Mora area - Second Beach Trail, Third Beach Trail and Handicap Trail at Rialto Beach.

    Ozette area - Sandpoint Trail and Cape Alava Trail.

    Lake Crescent/Sol Duc area - Spruce Railroad Trail, Lake Crescent Lodge Bovee's Meadow Trail and Sol Duc Falls Trail.

    Elwha area - Madison Falls Trail. Olympic Hot Springs Trail from the gate at the trailhead to the

    Boulder Creek Bridge.

    Hurricane area - Hurricane Hill Trail.

    Olympic Hot Springs area is defined as:

    That area beginning at the confluence of Crystal Creek and extending up Boulder Creek, including the areas 100 yards north and ¼ mile south of Boulder Creek shoreline, to ¼ mile west of the Olympic Hot Springs foot bridge.

    Backcountry is defined as:

    Any Park lands more than 1/4 mile from any developed area and any lands designated as Wilderness which lie less than 1/4 mile from a developed area.

    Developed Area is defined as:

    Roads, parking area, picnic area, campgrounds or other structures, facilities or lands located within development and historic zones depicted on the land use map.

    E-Cigarette / Personal Vaporizer defined as:

    A device containing a liquid or other legal substance that is vaporized and inhaled, typically used to simulate the experience of smoking tobacco.

    Ozette Loop is defined as:

    The coastal area from ½ mile north of the Ozette River to the headland south of Yellow Banks.

    Pack animals are defined as:

    Horses, burros, mules or other hoofed mammals when designated as pack animals by the superintendent.

    Personal watercraft are defined as:

    A motorboat that is less than 16 feet in length (measured from end to end, excluding sheet) which uses an inboard, internal combustion engine powering a water jet pump as its primary source of propulsion. The vessel is intended to be operated by a person or persons sitting, standing or kneeling on the vessel, rather than within the confines of the hull.

    Traction Devices are defined as:

    Chain link or cable chains, autosocks, or other traction devices deemed sufficient by the lead ranger on duty.

    Unmanned Aircraft (UAV, UAS, Drone, etc.) are defined as:

    A device that is used or intended to be used for flight in the air without the possibility of direct

    human intervention from within or on the device, and the associated operational elements and

    components that are required for the pilot or system operator in command to operate or control

    the device (such as cameras, sensors, communication links). This term includes all types of

    devices that meet this definition (e.g., model airplanes, quadcopters, drones) that are used for

    any purpose, including for recreation or commerce.

Last updated: January 9, 2018

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

600 E. Park Avenue
Port Angeles, WA 98362

Phone:

(360) 565-3130

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