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Visitors shopping at the Palace of the Governors; Sculpture La Puerta del Sol.
Discover Our Shared Heritage Travel Itinerary
El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro National Historic Trail

Credits

This travel itinerary was produced by the National Park Service’s Heritage Education Services and the National Park Service’s National Trails Intermountain Region in partnership with the National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers. It was created under the direction of Carol D. Shull, Chief, Heritage Education Services, National Park Service. The El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro National Historic Trail Discover Our Shared Heritage Travel Itinerary is based primarily on registration information on historic places in the National Park Service's National Register of Historic Places and National Historic Landmarks collections.

The itinerary was conceptualized by Aaron Mahr Yáñez, Superintendent, National Park Service’s National Trails Intermountain Region, who oversaw the development of the content. Michael Romero Taylor, Cultural Resources Specialist with the NPS National Trails Intermountain Region, administered the contract for writing narratives and photographing the historic sites. Carmella Padilla, a 17th-generation New Mexican and award-winning writer from Santa Fe, New Mexico, wrote the travel itinerary historical narratives. Contemporary photographs were taken by Jack Parsons, an award-winning photographer based in Santa Fe. Historic photographs are from these sources: New Mexico State Records Center and Archives, the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (New Mexico History Museum/Department of Cultural Affairs), the New Mexico Department of Tourism Photograph Collection, William A. Keleher Collection at the Center for Southwest Research of the University of New Mexico, and the Skip Clark Collection. Numerous individuals provided editing assistance and factual accuracy: Cordelia Thomas Snow, Michael Marshall, Gregory Smith, Nathan Stone, Richard Sims, Terry Moody, Chris Wilson, George Torok, Pat Taylor, Otis Halfmoon, Michael Elliott, Susan Boyle, Sharon Brown, Frank Norris, Mae Maginnis, Alex Knabe, and Steve Burns Chavez.

Carol D. Shull edited the itinerary and Cassie Ward programmed the itinerary into the template and provided editorial assistance. Jeff Joeckel of the National Register of Historic Places staff assisted in launching the itinerary.

El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro National Historic Trail is co-administered by the National Park Service and the Bureau of Land Management.

The Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (INAH, the National Institute of Anthropology and History), the Mexican federal government bureau established to guarantee research, protection, and promotion of the Mexican cultural patrimony, has been a key partner in the overall promotion of the historic trail. These efforts have been led by Francisco López Morales, Director of the INAH World Heritage Department. The National Park Service is linking this travel itinerary with a similar web-based itinerary produced by INAH.

The itinerary was produced with the support of the National Park Service's Stephanie Toothman, Associate Director for Cultural Resources, Partnerships and Science; Jon Smith, Deputy Associate Director Preservation Assistance Programs; and Paul Loether, Chief, National Register of Historic Places and National Historic Landmarks.

Rotating Banner from Homepage: Image Captions & Credits
Pueblo Indians selling pottery and jewelery on portal, Palace of the Governors, Santa Fe, New Mexico, c. 1925 to 1945.Photo Credit: Photographer unknown. Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DC). Neg.#0699735; Map of El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro National Historic Trail, Courtesy of the National Park Service; The union of two historic buildings—an adobe mercantile and a merchant’s residence—on the plaza of Mesilla in southern New Mexico, the Taylor-Barela-Reynolds building is a preservation model for Mesilla and other communities along El Camino Real. Photo © Michael Romero Taylor.

Constructed between 1877 and 1882, the iconic chapel at San Elizario’s former military presidio was the fourth chapel built after the
presidio’s establishment in 1788, Photo © Jack Parsons.

A vast expanse of mesquite, tarbush and creosote defines the well-trod terrain through Yost Draw on El Camino Real, Photo © Jack Parsons.

Group on plaza, Mesilla, New Mexico, c. 1890 - 1900, Photo Credit: Photographer unknown. Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DC). Neg.#014578.

The Territorial-era Basilica Cathedral of St. Francis stands on the site of Santa Fe's original adobe parróquia (parish church),
east of the historic plaza, Photo © Jack Parsons.

Palace of the Governors, Photo © of Jack Parsons.

Historic postcard of the "Automobile Road on La Bajada Hill," Public Domain.

Kuaua Ruins, Coronado State Monument, near Bernalillo, New Mexico, c. 1950, Photo Credit: Photographer unknown. Courtesy Palace
of the Governors Photo Archives  (NMHM/DCA. Neg. # HP.2007.20.185.)


El Cerro de Tomé near Los Lunas, New Mexico, offers stunning panoramic views, Photo © Jack Parsons.

Onion fields are among the agricultural riches of the Mesilla Valley, the largest irrigated stretch of farmlands in southern New Mexico, Photo © Jack Parsons.

Architecturally and spiritually, the Ysleta Mission showcases a unique juxtaposition of American Indian tradition with Christian religion, demonstrating the disparate influences that have impacted the West Texas community over 300 years, Photo © Jack Parsons.

A series of 15 to 20 buildings once formed the adobe garrison of Fort Selden, where 200 soldiers lived and worked, Photo © Jack Parsons.

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