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The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation's historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service's National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America's historic and archeological resources.

 

Property Name Kalorama Park and Archaeological Site
Reference Number 16000193
State District of Columbia
County District of Columbia
Town Washington
Street Address 1875 Columbia Road NW
Multiple Property Submission Name N/A
Status Listed 4/21/2016
Areas of Significance COMMUNITY PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT, SOCIAL HISTORY, ARCHAEOLOGY:HISTORIC
Link to full file http://www.nps.gov/nr/feature/places/pdfs/16000193.pdf
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Kalorama Park, a triangular park on the west side of Columbia Road between 19th Street and Mintwood Place, is an approximately three-acre park that occupies the former domestic complex of a 56.5-acre plantation, owned and operated by John Little during the 19th century. In 1836, John Little, a Washington-born butcher, bought the 56.5 acres to farm and raise cattle. He built his dwelling house on one of the highest points of his land-the future site of Kalorama Park- and began purchasing slaves to provide the labor for his farming operations. John Little's farm was clearly successful; sometime around 1850, Little constructed a new three-story, Italianatestyle frame dwelling-known through photographs-which stood on the site until it was demolished in 1937. (The exact date of construction is unknown; however, the Italianate style of the house is consistent with a ca. 1850 date of construction.) According to the 1860 U.S. Census, Little owned 13 slaves, some of whom were born on his plantation and one of whom, Hortense Prout, made her mark in history in a "daring bid for freedom" at the start of the Civil War. In April 1862, ten months after her escape, President Lincoln abolished slavery in the District, making Hortense Prout one of the last known enslaved Washingtonians to attempt to escape slavery.

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Properties are listed in the National Register of Historic Places under four criteria: A, B, C, and D. For information on what these criterion are and how they are applied, please see our Bulletin on How to Apply the National Register Criteria