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National Register of Historic Places Program

The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation's historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service's National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America's historic and archeological resources.

 

Property Name Landsberg, William, House
Reference Number 14000490
State New York
County Nassau
Town Port Washington
Street Address 5 Tianderah Rd.
Multiple Property Submission Name N/A
Status Listed 8/18/2014
Areas of Significance Architecture
Link to full file https://www.nps.gov/nr/feature/places/pdfs/14000490.pdf
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The William Landsberg House, built in 1951, is significant under C as an excellent example of modernist residential architecture on Long Island. Designed by William Landsberg, a modernist architect and associate of Marcel Breuer, the house received national and international attention. Landsberg was educated in Harvard's first class of graduate students under Walter Gropius and Marcel Breuer, and later worked for both men professionally. As head draftsman and Director of Design, Landsberg helped Breuer launch his architectural practice in New York City. During his eight-year tenure in the office, Landsberg worked on projects of regional, national, and international importance, including the MoMA House in the Garden, the Grosse Point Public Library, and the UNESCO Headquarters in Paris. Landsberg also operated a successful Long Island-based architectural practice; his designs incorporate Breuer-esque details, but distinctly feature Landsberg's preference for openness, simplicity, efficiency, and natural materials. Built in the years after World War II, the William Landsberg house marks a transition in modern architecture on Long Island from second and beach homes to primary residences. Tucked into a sloping site within the established neighborhood of Baxter Estates, the twostory, cypress and glass house floats within the wooded landscape. Though finished modestly, the house included state-of-the-art conveniences and was well-designed to maximize interior space and create a feeling of openness. Remarkably intact to its 1951 construction and 1963 addition, the house clearly and consistently represents Landsberg's design preferences and intent.

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Properties are listed in the National Register of Historic Places under four criteria: A, B, C, and D. For information on what these criterion are and how they are applied, please see our Bulletin on How to Apply the National Register Criteria