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National Register of Historic Places Program

The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation's historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service's National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America's historic and archeological resources.

 

Property Name Tennessee Supreme Court Building
Reference Number 14000084
State Tennessee
County Davidson
Town Nashville
Street Address 401 Seventh Avenue North
Multiple Property Submission Name N/A
Status Listed 3/18/2014
Areas of Significance ARCHITECTURE, LAW, GOVERNMENT
Link to full file https://www.nps.gov/nr/feature/places/pdfs/14000084.pdf
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The Tennessee Supreme Court Building, located in Nashville (Davidson County), Tennessee, is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places for Criteria A and C in the areas of Law, Government, and Architecture at the State and Local levels of significance. From its construction to the present, the Tennessee Supreme Court Building has been important to the Nashville community and the State of Tennessee, both civically and architecturally. Under Criterion A, the building is significant in the area of Law and Government. Decades of important rulings and legal precedents occurred at the Tennessee Supreme Court Building, which was the first building in Tennessee specifically constructed to house the Supreme Court and the Court of Appeals. Also under this Criterion, the building is significant as a New Deal-era project, partially funded by the Public Works Administration (PWA). Under Criterion C, the building is architecturally significant as a prime example of Stripped Classicism, and representative of the work of the Nashville based architectural firm, Marr and Holman. The building retains an exceptionally high level of integrity on the interior and exterior. The period of significance begins in 1936 with the beginning of construction, and ends in 1965, when the fourth floor was reconfigured to accommodate the need for office space related to the newly established position of Secretary of the Supreme Court and associated staff.

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Properties are listed in the National Register of Historic Places under four criteria: A, B, C, and D. For information on what these criterion are and how they are applied, please see our Bulletin on How to Apply the National Register Criteria