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National Register of Historic Places Program

The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation's historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service's National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America's historic and archeological resources.

 

Property Name Westmoreland Water Wheel & Gatepost
Reference Number 13000949
State Tennessee
County Knox
Town Knoxville
Street Address NE and NW comers of intersection of Sherwood Dr. and Westland Ave.
Multiple Property Submission Name Historic and Architectural Resources in Knoxville and Knox County, Tennessee
Status Listed 12/18/2013
Areas of Significance ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURE, COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT
Link to full file https://www.nps.gov/nr/feature/places/pdfs/13000949.pdf
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The Westmoreland Water Wheel and Gatepost are being nominated to the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion C for their excellent representation of the Tudor Revival architectural style and under Criterion C for their contribution to the development of the Westmoreland Heights Subdivision as the source of water and electricity prior to city services. The Westmoreland Wheelhouse (built in 1923) and the Gatepost (built in 1925) were designed by noted local architect Charles I. Barber of the firm Barber and McMurry. Prominent local landscape architect, Charles F. Lester provided the landscape design for the structures. The Water Wheel is a steel overshot wheel purchased by Edward T. Manning, President of the Tennessee Mill & Mine Supply Company from the Fitz Water Wheel Company of Hanover, Pennsylvania and installed by R.A. Calloway, an employee with the Tennessee Mill & Mine Supply Company. The use of East Tennessee marble is the most notable exterior architectural feature of these structures; other architectural materials worth mentioning are wood, slate, and iron. The Westmoreland Water Wheel and Gatepost retain a high degree of architectural integrity and are an excellent example of the Tudor Revival style in Knox County and meet the requirements of the National Register of Historic Places. The Westmoreland Water Wheel and Gatepost also meet the registration requirements in the Historic and Architectural Resources of Knoxville and Knox County, Tennessee Multiple Property Listing under the historic context of Suburban Growth and Development in Knoxville, 1861-1940.

 

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Properties are listed in the National Register of Historic Places under four criteria: A, B, C, and D. For information on what these criterion are and how they are applied, please see our Bulletin on How to Apply the National Register Criteria