National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior

National Register of Historic Places Program:
Lists of Weekly Actions 2014

The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation's historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service's National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America's historic and archeological resources.

 

 

 

Weekly List Main page (with links to all years)

 

Week Weekly Highlight
Weekly List for December 24, 2014

Lakewold, in Lakewood, Washington

represents the work of noted master landscape architect Thomas D. Church and architects William & Geoffrey Platt. hurch is nationally recognized as one of the pioneer landscape designers of Modernism in garden landscape design known as the 'California Style. Read more . . .

Weekly List for December 19, 2014  
Weekly List for December 12, 2014

Original Little League Field, Williamsport, Pennsylvania
 At this location during the summer of 1938, the official dimensions of the Little League playing field were determined. From 1939 through 1941, Carl E. Stotz moved his little league teams from one vacant and available lot to another always in the vicinity of the nominated site. In 1942, Original Little League Field was established and became home to this 9-12 year old baseball for boys organization. Upon this field, the first National Little League Tournament (1947) was held, as well as, the first Little League World Series (1950). Read more . . .  

Weekly List for December 5, 2014 Montana State Training School Historic District, Boulder, Montana
holds historical significance for its associations with the state's education, treatment, and custodial care of its citizens with disabilities. Including academic buildings, dormitories, and a resident cottage, the historic district documents the evolution of both national and state institutional and cultural attitudes toward the disabled, particularly those with cognitive impairments. Read more . . .
Weekly List for November 28, 2014

Turtle and Shark, American Samoa
Turtle and Shark (Laumei ma Malie in Samoan) is a place associated with beliefs, customs, and practices that are significant to the cultural traditions and ethnic history of the American Samoan community. Read more . . .

Weekly List for November 21, 2014

South Park City Museum, Fairplay, Colorado
The South Park City Museum is an intact mid-twentieth century outdoor museum interpreting a frontier mining community, significant for its association with Park County tourism, the Rush to the Rockies, and early historic preservation efforts in Park County. Read more . . .

Weekly List for November 14, 2014

Sacramento's Historic City Cemetery, Sacramento, California

is associated with the onset of the Gold Rush in 1848 and the subsequent, rapid settlement of Sacramento as a permanent commercial, transportation, and political hub. Read more . . .

Weekly List for November 7, 2014

Cuba Lodge No. 312 A.F. and A.M., in Cuba, Missouri

Completed in 1940 and built entirely of local stone, this fraternal hall was constructed as the first permanent and ultimately the final home of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Cuba. Comprised of both coursed and random ashlar stonework, the masonry is attributed to local man David R. Sharp; additional sources indicate that another area mason named Albert C. Stumpf may have also worked on the structure. Read more . . .

Weekly List for October 31, 2014

Creek Street Historic District, Ketchikan, Alaska

The Creek Street Historic District is a cohesive neighborhood that represents the social and economic history of Ketchikan and Alaska during the first half of the twentieth century. It represents individuals from many walks of life and many cultural backgrounds whose skills and talents contributed to the development and growth of the city. Early residents included Native people, business proprietors, trades people, and prostitutes. Read more . . .

 

Weekly List for October 24, 2014

New York State Barge Canal, New York

The New York State Barge Canal is a nationally significant work of early twentieth century engineering and construction that affected transportation and maritime commerce across the eastern third of the continent for nearly half a century. It was also an embodiment of Progressive Era beliefs that public works and public control of transportation infrastructure could counterbalance the growing monopoly power of railroads and other corporations. In an era when most of the country's canals had been abandoned and railroads dominated inland transportation, New Yorkers voted to rebuild their canals on a massive scale, both to protect the maritime commerce of New York and Buffalo and as a check on the growing stranglehold that railroad trusts exerted over the American economy. The period of significance is defined as beginning with the initiation of canal construction in 1905 and extending through its last large scale improvements in 1963. Read more . . .

Weekly List for October 17, 2014

Martin, Handel T., House, Lawrence, Kansas

The Martin House is significant under Criterion B in the area of social history for its association with the life and career of Handel T. Martin (1862-1931), an early fossil collector and contributor to the developing field of vertebrate paleontology. Although lacking an academic degree, Martin served as a field and laboratory worker, an instructor and assistant curator of the Natural History collections at the University of Kansas in the early twentieth century. Read more . . .

Weekly List for October 10, 2014

Standard Material Company/ Gyro Motor Company, Washington DC
The property meets Criterion A for its associations with important advancements in flat disc records; experimentation and advancements in vertical flight; and the improvement and commercialization of the first Gyro Motor used in the bi-plane. All of these events occurred at least in part within the building. Read more . . .

Weekly List for October 3, 2014 The Forum, in Inglewood, California
The Forum is a rare, intact example of a post-World War II sports arena. It is significant in the area of Architecture, and it is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places at the local level of significance under Criterion Cas an excellent example of New Formalism in Southern California, and as a prominent example of the work of architect Charles Luckman. Read more . . .
Weekly List for September 26, 2014

Rock City Gardens, Lookout Mountain, Georgia
Initially developed by Frieda Utermoehlen Carter {1880-1964) and her husband, Garnet Carter {1883-1954), Rock City Gardens was opened to the public on May 21, 1932. The setting consists of unusual geological landforms atop Lookout Mountain, which have drawn curious onlookers since the mid-19th century. The Carters transformed the site into an elaborately designed rock garden with pathways, bridges, vegetation, overlooks, and visitor facilities. Read more . . .

Weekly List for September 19, 2014

Anshe Chesed Cemetery, in Vicksburg, Mississippi
Jews were among the first settlers in Vicksburg and, through their participation in the commercial, political, and social activities, were active in the development of Vicksburg. Anshe Chesed Cemetery is the most significant remaining resource that is associated with the Jewish heritage of Vicksburg. Read more . . .

Weekly List for September 12, 2014 Mollenhauer, John House in Bay Shore, New York
John Mollenhauer, a German immigrant, started as a grocer and eventually founded several businesses, culminating in the Mollenhauer Sugar Refinery. Respected for his business acumen and success, he was known as the "Sugar King of Brooklyn."
Read more . . .
Weekly List for September 5, 2014

Kensington Park-Groveland Historic District, in Savannah, Georgia
Kensington Park and Groveland feature one of the best collections of mid-20th -century domestic architecture in Savannah, representing a variety of architectural styles and house types built in middle- to upper-middle-class neighborhoods in Savannah. Read more . . .

Butterfield Overland Mail Corridor
Salt Flat, Texas

is directly associated with pivotal events and a broad-sweeping national pattern of western expansion and settlement through which all-purpose transportation corridors were conceived and constructed to unite the vast American landscape. Read more . . .

Weekly List for August 29, 2014 Chandor Gardens Weatherford, Texas
a five-acre estate in Weatherford, Parker County, Texas, was the home and studio of English-born portrait painter Douglas Chandor and his wife Ina. Born in 1897 and trained at the Slade School in London, Chandor came to the United States in 1926, and continued a successful career as a portrait painter for wealthy financiers, industrialists, politicians, educators, and other prominent people, including Queen Elizabeth and Winston Churchill. Read more . . .
Weekly List for August 22, 2014 Bellefontaine Cemetery
St. Louis, Missouri
Bellefontaine Cemetery, established in 1849 as the Rural Cemetery Association of St. Louis, is nationally significant for its landscape architecture (Criterion C) as a unique hybrid of the rural and landscape-lawn cemetery movements. Bellefontaine did not adapt either influence (rural or landscape-lawn) exclusively but instead, merged both into its overall landscape design. Read more . . .
Weekly List for August 15, 2014 Catoctin Recreational Demonstration Area
Thurmont, Maryland
The park contains a variety of geological, archeological, architectural, and landscape features and characteristics that together illustrate historical and ecological trends from prehistory through the present. The land and its resources are primarily significant at the national and state levels as one of forty-six Recreational Demonstration Areas (RDAs) developed across the nation as part of Depression-era federal recovery programs initiated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Read more . . .
Weekly List for August 8, 2014 William Penn Memorial Museum and State Achives Building, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Designed by the Harrisburg architecture firm of Lawrie and Green, and completed in 1964, the William Penn Memorial Museum and State Archives Building was designed to commemorate Pennsylvania's founder and accommodate the state's museum exhibits and archival records. Read more . . .
Weekly List for August 1, 2014

Thompson Draw Summer Homes Unit 1 Historic District,, Payson, Arizona
The district consists of an intact and reasonably unchanged group of summer home cabins constructed under lease permits on the Tonto National Forest to provide recreational opportunities for Arizona's desert dwellers. Read more . .

Weekly List for July 25, 2014 3 Nebraska Highway MPS Covers:
Potash Highway in Nebraska MPS, U.S. Highway 20 in Nebraska MPS, and Detroit - Lincoln - Denver Highway in Nebraska MPS. Read more . . .
Weekly List for July 18, 2014 Lee, Arthur and Edith, House, Minneapolis, Minnesota
A series of menacing protests described as "riots" in the newspapers enveloped 4600 Columbus Avenue South following its purchase in June 1931 by Arthur and Edith Lee. The young couple was African-American, and they chose to buy a house in the "Field" neighborhood, part of South Minneapolis that area homeowners considered to be a "white neighborhood." Read more . . .
Weekly List for July 11, 2014 Fort Ord Station Veterinary Hospital, Marina, California
It was one of the last built medical facilities for mounted, horse-drawn, and mule-packing units of the U.S. Army. Twelve Series 700 station veterinary hospitals were built at forts around the nation in the WWII mobilization era, including the SVH at Fort Ord, the only known complete hospital surviving. Read more . . .
Weekly List for July 3, 2014 Pond Farm Pottery Historic District, Guerneville, California
Pond Farm Pottery is significant under Criteria A and B at the national level of significance in the areas of Art, Education, and Social History for its association with the Studio Pottery Movement and ceramist and teacher Marguerite Wildenhain who lived, worked, and taught at Pond Farm. Read more . . .
Weekly List for June 27, 2014

Weekly list combined with July 3rd.

Weekly List for June 20, 2014

International Trade Mart, New Orleans, Louisiana
The building's setting and shape illustrate and symbolize its function as well as the city's role as a center for global trade. The symbolic importance of the ITM to the port and to the city of New Orleans cannot be over-estimated.
Read more . . .

Barnes, David A. , House, Murfreesboro, North Carolina
is a remarkable dwelling designed by master builder Jacob W. Holt in 1875. The Barnes House is the apogee of the second, postwar phase of Holt's career and the largest and most exuberantly finished dwelling remaining from the final years of Holt's work in North Carolina. Read more . . .

Weekly List for June 13, 2014 Tarpon Springs Greektown Historic District, Tarpon Springs, Florida
The Tarpon Springs Greektown area is the epitome of a Greek American traditional cultural property. For local Greek Americans, it is a place of great significance in terms of its tenacious continuity of traditional culture, extensive Greek infrastructure, and also because it is the focal point for Greek culture for the region and the only Greek community based on the sponge industry. Read more . . .
Weekly List for June 02, 2014

Shirley Hills Historic District (Boundary Increase and Additional Documentation) in Macon, Georgia

This amendment: 1) extends the period of significance to 1967; 2) enlarges the boundaries of the Shirley Hills Historic District to include later developments to the north; and 3) reevaluates the National Register eligibility of each property in the amended historic district. Read more . . .

Weekly List for May 30, 2014

Oregon City Municipal Elevator, in Oregon City, Oregon
The elevator's designer, Gordon E. Trapp, broke with historic architectural traditions to create a new, sleek, Modernist icon for Oregon City. The elevator is a unique and highly practical response to the city's dramatic landscape and its intrinsic challenges for pedestrians. Read more . . .

Weekly List for May 23, 2014

Carters Run Rural Historic District, in Fauquier County, Virginia
Continued, active farming has ensured the integrity of the rural landscape, which is evidenced through the area's historic property lines, pastures, and wooded lots, as well as through the built environment. Read more . . .

Weekly List for May 16, 2014 St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Englewood, New Jersey
St. Paul's Episcopal Church was founded in 1865 in Englewood, NJ. The Sunday school building (now chapel) late Victorian reivial in style and the church late English Gothic in style. Both buildings were designed by Thornton Floyd Turner ,1 a former parishioner and well-respected New York City architect. St. Paul's Episcopal Church houses exceptional examples of stained glass, designed by three master stained glass studios -Louis Comfort Tiffany, John La Farge, and the J & R Lamb Studios with designs by Frederick S. Lamb and Katherine Lamb Tait. Read more . . .
Weekly List for May 9, 2014 River Road - Mead Avenue Historic District in Greenwich, Connecticut
Is architecturally significant primarily because of its nineteenth-century dwellings, including notable examples of the Greek Revival, Italianate, and Second Empire styles, as well as three carriage houses that have been remodeled into dwellings. Read more . . .
Weekly List for May 2, 2014 Coffee Pot Restaurant, The in Tacoma, Washington
Built in response to the booming popularity of the automobile in the late 1920s, buildings like the Coffee Pot Restaurant were constructed to captivate potential customers. They were designed in the unique Programatic, or Mimetic style of architecture which conveyed the use or purpose of the building. Over the years, The Coffee Pot Restaurant (known as Bob's Java Jive since the mid 1950s), has become a prominent fixture in the Tacoma community. Read More . . .
Weekly List for April 25, 2014

Cypress Gardens in Winter Haven, Florida
Cypress Gardens has local and statewide significance under Criteria A and B in the area of Entertainment/Recreation as one most widely recognized tourist attractions in Florida's history, and for its association with its creator and promoter, Richard Downing (Dick) Pope, who was often called the "Father of Florida Tourism." Read more . . .

Weekly List for April 18, 2014 Indian Mounds Park Mound Group in St. Paul, Minnesota
The Indian Mounds Park site (21 RA 1 0) in St. Paul, Minnesota is unique for preserving the only remaining burial mounds within the Minneapolis-St. Paul urban core, which roughly overlies the traditional cultural hub of the Dakota. The site is also significant for providing evidence of the northernmost examples of Hopewell-style earthworks along the Mississippi River. Read more . . .
Weekly List for April 11, 2014 Fisher, Dr. Norman and Doris, House in Hatboro, Pennsylvania
This extremely intact residence designed by architect Louis I. Kahn possesses national architectural significance under Criterion Cas an important residential example of the Modern style and the work of a 20th century master. Read more . . .
Weekly List for April 04, 2014

The Early Community Mausoleum Movement in Indiana MPS

The early development of community mausolea in the State of Indiana was in response to a number of issues prominent at the beginning of the 20 th century. Probably the most significant factor that allowed the development of community mausolea was the cultural acceptance of a burial practice that differed from traditional practices in America.  Read more . . .

Weekly List for March 28, 2014

Dorothy Riester House and Studio, Cazenovia, New York
The property reflects the artistic vision of the well-known regional sculptor, Dorothy Riester.  Personally involved in the hands-on design and construction of the house, Riester approached the building as a sort of large-scale, livable sculpture. Read more . . . 

 

Mount Rushmore National Memorial Historic District (Additional Documentation and Boundary Increase), Keystone, South Dakota

Mount Rushmore National Memorial Historic District is nationally significant under National Register Criteria A, B, C, and D as a designed historic landscape that dramatically focuses attention on one of America's and greatest and most enduring monuments, the Shrine of Democracy sculpture. Read more . . .

Weekly List for March 21, 2014

Woodward Park and Gardens Historic District, Tulsa, Oklahoma

is best known for two garden areas the Upper and Lower Rock Gardens, and the formal terraces of the Tulsa Rose Garden that were established during the 1930s using public monies and constructed by laborers enrolled in work-relief programs.  Read more . . .

Weekly List for March 14, 2014

Lasky-DeMille Barn,  Los Angeles, California
The Barn' s association with the beginnings of the industry in Hollywood, its direct association with the early careers of Cecil B. De Mille and Jesse Lasky, two of the acknowledged pioneers of the industry , and its continued use as a part of a studio complex and television set combine to make its significance to Hollywood and the film industry irrefutable.
Read more . . .

Weekly List for March 7, 2014 Mid-Twentieth-Century Modern Residential Architecture on Outer Cape Cod, 1929 – 1979 MPS, Massachusetts
These houses emerged from a burgeoning recreational industry combined with the extraordinary confluence of Modern international and American architectural, artistic, intellectual, and social forces within Massachusetts, the region, and the nation. Read more . .
Weekly List for February 28, 2014 Fulton County Almshouse,  Atlanta, Georgia
The building is significant in the area of social history for its important role in caring for its impoverished and elderly residents who often had no other place to live. This is one of only two known extant examples of former almshouses in Fulton County. It is also significant in women's history for the contributions of the superintendent Jessie Early Clark Boynton (1902-1980) who ran the facility from 1932 to 1963.
Read more . . .
Weekly List for February 21, 2014 Van Zandt, Jacobs and Company Collar and Cuff Factory, Troy, New York
At the time the factory was in operation, Troy was a national leader in the manufacture of detachable shirt collars and cuffs. Nearly one in four residents of Troy worked in textile factories in the early 1900s. Van Zandt, Jacobs & Company operated textile factories in Troy from 1887 into the last half of the 20th century. Read more . . .
Weekly List for February 14, 2014 James River Steam Brewery Cellars,  Richmond, Virgina
The vaulted brick cellars on the west side of the Rocketts Landing development are the sole surviving remnant of the James River Steam Brewery, which operated here from 1866 to 1879.  Built shortly before the advent of mechanical refrigeration, the cellars represented the apex of mid-nineteenth-century brewery architecture and technology. Read more . . .
Weekly List for February 7, 2014 Gemiluth Chassodim Synagogue, Alexandria, Louisiana
The sanctuary is exemplary of two major trends in architecture of the period: abstractionism and the veneration of Frank Lloyd Wright. It is Alexandria's most abstract piece of architecture from the period and a particularly notable example of Wrightian influence. Read more . . .
Weekly List for January 31, 2014

Baseball Spring Training week!

Astrodome, Houston, Texas
Completed in 1965, the Astrodome in Houston, Harris County, Texas, is an engineering marvel of its time. As the first enclosed and air-conditioned sports stadium in the United States, the Astrodome boasted the largest clear span dome at the time of its completion (642 feet). Read  more  . . .  

And  

Hiram Bithorn Municipal Stadium,  Hato Rey, Puerto Rico

Since its construction in 1962, the Hiram Bithorn Stadium has served as venue for events of great importance such as sports tournaments and professionals practices; amateur tournaments of baseball, basketball and football; intercollegiate games, boxing, wrestling and car competitions. Even more significant in establishing the stadium's reputation as the main stage within all the ballparks in the island during the 1960s, was the continuous parade a great local players within its diamond, like Luis Arroyo, Victor Pellot, Felix Mantilla, Julio Navarro, Orlando "Peruchin" Cepeda and Roberto Clemente. Read more . . .

Weekly List for January 24, 2014

Lightfoot. George M. House, in Washington, DC
The house was purchased in 1917 by George M. Lightfoot, a professor at Howard University, who resided in the home from 1933 until his death in 1947.  The home represents black homeownership at a time when few African Americans were able to purchase grand homes in Washington's suburban areas. Additionally, Lightfoot, devoted to the cause of classical education for African Americans, was noted for the salons conducted in his home attended by prominent black intellectuals such as Carter G. Woodson, WEB Dubois and Alain Locke.   Read  more . . .

Weekly List for January 17, 2014

Two featues this week:

Jackson, Sullivan and Richie Jean, House, in Dallas County, Alabama:
The building was a strategy center for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) during the Selma Civil Rights Movement, 1958-1965. Read more . . .

And

Stamper, Hiram and Art, House, in Knott County, Kentucky:
is significant as the home of two master fiddlers, Hiram Stamper (1893 - 1992) and Art Stamper (1933-2005). Hiram Stamper was a well known fiddler within traditional Old Time Music. Art Stamper learned Old Time fiddling from his father, and contributed greatly to other forms , including Bluegrass Music, and Mountain Music, Read more . . .

Weekly List for January 10, 2014

Windsor Park Historic District, Brunswick, Georgia
The Windsor Park Historic District Is significant In the area of architecture for its good, intact collection of house types and styles found in middle-class neighborhoods in Georgia from the 1920s through the 1960s. In the area of community planning and development. Windsor Park is significant because It represents an early planned picturesque subdivision In Brunswick. It retains the historic layout of streets and lots, which was a departure from the gridiron pattern that had dominated Brunswick's previous development. Read more . . .

Weekly List for January 3, 2014 Three Hills, Warm Springs, Virginia
is significant for its association with nationally-renowned author Mary Johnston, who had the house built in 1913 as her private residence. Johnston, the first best-selling novelist of the 20th century, was best known for her popular historical romances featuring heroes and heroines of colonial Virginia.
Read more . . .