2018 Education Programs

The Interpretation and Education Team at Mount Rushmore National Memorial is pleased to announce our 2018 education programs. One of the continuing goals of the National Park Service as we begin our second century is to strive to connect with and create the next generation of park visitors, supporters and advocates. We invite you to take advantage of our variety of program offerings, either in your classroom or at the memorial.

Key Dates for 2018

Park Rangers in the Classroom Available January 22 through April 13, 2018
Field-Trips including a Ranger-led Program April 16 through May 4 , 2018


Requests for field trips or classroom programs should be made at least two weeks prior to desired date. If you have questions please contact:

Marvin Achtenberg
marvin_achtenberg@nps.gov
(605) 574-3195
fax (605) 574-2307

 

Many Ways to Explore Mount Rushmore

K-12 Curriculum Guides

In partnership with CyArk, Mount Rushmore National Memorial has developed ten lesson plans that feature hands-on and computer based activities. These plans adhere to the National Common Core Standards. Lesson plans are available for free with online registration. Lesson plans download in a compressed folder containing activity instructions, slide shows, and student sheets. To access lesson plans, go to: http://www.cyark.org/education/.

Every Kid In A Park Pass

Get passes for your fourth- grade students! As a fourth-grade educator, you can download an activity and print paper vouchers for each of your students, which can then be exchanged for an Every Kid In A Park Pass the next time your students visit a national park site. This program only provides passes for fourth graders. Go online today and visit www.everykidinapark.gov to learn more.

 

Field Trips to Mount Rushmore

Mount Rushmore National Memorial welcomes school groups throughout the year for self-guided tours that include the movie, Mount Rushmore - the Shrine, the Lincoln Borglum Visitor Center’s exhibit hall, and the half mile Presidential Trail (weather permitting). During our Field Trip Season, April 13 through May 4, school groups may participate in a ranger led activity. These ranger talks are available by reservation only, pending ranger availability.


Due to a year long renovation and rehabilitation project, the Sculptor's Studio will not be available for field trips in 2018.

To defray the cost of school bus parking, teachers may apply to have bus fees paid with funds provided by the Mount Rushmore Bookstores.

For more information about reserving a field trip and applying for the parking scholarship, please email: marvin_achtenberg@nps.gov

 

Special Education Program

Available Tuesday through Friday, through March 30, 2018

Mount Rushmore has created a special education interactive opportunity conducted in one of the Lincoln Borglum Visitor Center theaters. The environmental conditions in the theaters are appropriate for a special education class, with low lighting. It is a quiet place for students with sensitivity to environmental stimuli and is handicap accessible. The students will listen to the ranger explain the carving of Mount Rushmore, have the opportunity to see and touch the tools and a piece of rock removed from Mount Rushmore during carving. The participants will also get a chance to see an eye and nose that has been printed to the scale of the sculpture.

To request this program, please email Marvin_Achtenberg@nps.gov or call (605) 574-3195.
 

Rushmore Rangers in the Classroom

Rangers are available January 22 through April 13, 2018, for classroom programs. Education outreach programs are designed to support South Dakota curriculum content standards and are available free of charge to Black Hills area schools. We request that teachers remain in the classroom during these programs.

To request a classroom program, please email: marvin_achtenberg@nps.gov

 

Kindergarten and First

The Men and Women of Mount Rushmore
Ranger Jeanie
Available Tuesday through Friday

30 minutes

Did you know that both men and women worked during the carving process at Mount Rushmore? Through a PowerPoint slides and activity explore what these men and women did. The students will learn about the different job titles and the process to make Mount Rushmore.

State Standards:

  • K-12.H.2 Students will analyze and evaluate the impact of people, events, ideas, and symbols upon history using multiple sources.
  • K-12.G.6 Students will understand the ways in which humans culturally adapt to, use, and modify the natural environment and its various elements.
  • K-12.G.3 Students will recognize the characteristics of the processes that shape places and regions.

 

Kingergarten and First

A Rough Riding Life-The History of Teddy Roosevelt
Ranger Jeanie
Available Tuesday through Friday
30 minutes

From a sickly child to a robust President, the students will learn about the different adversities and adventures that shaped Teddy Roosevelt, with the help of PowerPoint slides and an activity. The students will also learn about the story of the Teddy Bear.

State Standards:

  • K-12.H.2 Students will analyze and evaluate the impact of people, events, ideas, and symbols upon history using multiple sources.

  • K-12.G.6 Students will understand the ways in which humans culturally adapt to, use, and modify the natural environment and its various elements.

  • K-12.G.3 Students will recognize the characteristics of the processes that shape places and regions.

 

First

Who Am I?
Ranger Jared
Available Monday, Tuesday and Friday
30 minutes

Using questioning and listening skills, students will learn how to identify animals and plants from South Dakota, some of the basic facts about them and how they live and interact with each other.

State Standards:

  • 1-LS3-1 Construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly like, their parents.
  • 1-LS1-2 Read texts and use media to determine patterns in behavior of parents and offspring that help offspring survive.
  • 1-LS1-1 Design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.
 

First

Lakota Language
Ranger Darrell
Available Monday, Wednesday and Friday
30 minutes

Using the story of Mother Nature as told by the Oglala Lakota people, students will learn Lakota language using Level One Lakota-based curriculum from the Lakota Language Consortium text book and flash cards. Students will need pencils and paper for this program.

World Language Standards:

  • Standard 1.1: Students engage in conversations, provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions.
  • Standard 1.2: Students understand and interpret written and spoken language on a variety of topics.
 

First and Second

Our Changing World
Ranger Reed
Available Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
30 Minutes

Using pictures from the past and present, students will be able to witness the change's humans have made to South Dakota over long periods of time, gain understanding of the positives and negatives of these changes, and learn how to make their own changes that will make their community a healthier place to live! Students will need pencils and paper for this program.

State Standards:

  • 2.G.6.1 Describe positive and negative consequences of changing the physical environment of the local community.

  • 2.G.6.2 Suggest ways people can responsibly interact with the environment in the local community.

 

Second

Mount Rushmore Rocks
Ranger Anthony
Available Monday, Thursday and Friday
30 minutes

With the use of a PowerPoint, classroom discussion, and a hands-on classroom activity students will explore the different types of rock found in the Black Hills. They will compare and contrast the various types of rock and whether or not they are suitable for mountain carving.

State Standards:

  • 2-PS1-2 Analyze data obtained from testing different materials to determine which materials have the properties that are best suited for an intended purpose.
 

Second

The Story of Rushmore
Ranger Anthony
Available Monday, Thursday and Friday
30 minutes

Students will experience the story of Mount Rushmore from the beginning to the middle to the end, although not necessarily in that order! This program uses a PowerPoint as well as a classroom activity to explore the history of Mount Rushmore from multiple viewpoints.

State Standards:

  • 2.H.1.1 Demonstrate chronological order using events from history.

 

Second Through Fifth

The Men and Women of Mount Rushmore
Ranger Jeanie
Available Tuesday through Friday
45 minutes

Did you know that both men and women worked during the carving process at Mount Rushmore? Through a PowerPoint slides and activity explore what these men and women did. The students will learn about the different job titles and the process to make Mount Rushmore.

State Standards:

  • K-12.H.2 Students will analyze and evaluate the impact of people, events, ideas, and symbols upon history using multiple sources
  • K-12.G.6 Students will understand the ways in which humans culturally adapt to, use, and modify the natural environment and its various elements
  • K-12.G.3 Students will recognize the characteristics of the processes that shape places and regions.
 

Second Through Fifth

A Rough Riding Life - The History of Teddy Roosevelt
Ranger Jeanie
Available Tuesday through Friday
45 minutes

From a sickly child to a robust President, the students will learn about the different adversities and adventures that shaped Teddy Roosevelt, with the help of PowerPoint slides and an activity.

State Standards:

  • K-12.H.2 Students will analyze and evaluate the impact of people, events, ideas, and symbols upon history using multiple sources
  • K-12.G.6 Students will understand the ways in which humans culturally adapt to, use, and modify the natural environment and its various elements
  • K-12.G.3 Students will recognize the characteristics of the processes that shape places and regions.
 

Third

A Beast the Color of Winter
Ranger Anthony
Available Monday, Thursday and Friday
45 minutes

Using a PowerPoint, classroom discussion, and the physical examination of mountain goats students will gain an understanding about the life and characteristics of these cliff-climbing animals. Students will learn how the mountain goat thrives in the Black Hills with its special adaptations, even though it is a nonnative species.

State Standards:

  • 3-LS2-1 Construct an argument that some animals form groups that help members survive.
  • 3-LS4-3 Construct an argument with evidence how some organisms thrive, some struggle to survive, and some cannot survive in a particular habitat.
 

Third

The Story of Mount Rushmore
Ranger Ed
Available Monday, Thursday and Friday
45 minutes

With a presentation, student workbook, and critical thinking activities, students will explore Mount Rushmore as an integral part of their community’s history. Students will understand why the memorial was carved, what Mount Rushmore represents, and how Borglum overcame many obstacles during the carving process.

State Standards:

  • 3.H.2.2 Explain the importance of famous American figures.
  • 3.H.2.3 Analyze a community’s culture and history.
  • 3.C.1.1. Research and explain the meaning behind South Dakota’s symbols.
 

Third and Fourth

Canal of Learning: Theodore Roosevelt & the Panama Canal
Ranger Jared
Available Monday, Tuesday and Friday
45 minutes

A look at where and how humans were able to change land and join two oceans. Students will learn about simple machines used to construct the Panaman Canal and use maps to illustrate the time and distance saved by its existence.

State Standards:

  • 3 – PS2-1 Investigate to provide evidence of the effects of forces on the motion of an object.
  • 3- PS2-2 Observe and/or measure an object’s motion to predict future motion.
  • 4-ESS2-2 Analyze and interpret data from maps to describe patterns of Earth’s features.
 

Third and Fourth

I Spy Roosevelt!
Ranger Jared
Available Monday, Tuesday and Friday
30 minutes

Students will learn about Theodore Roosevelt in a fun way as they take a trip through the life of the 26th President. Students will use a worksheet and large illustration to seek and find symbols representing the different period of his life.

State Standards:

  • K-12.H.2Students will analyze and evaluate the impact of people, events, ideas and symbols upon history using multiple sources.
  • 3. H.2.1Generate questions about individuals and groups who have shaped significant historical changes and continuities.
  • 3. H.2.2 explains the importance of famous American figures including but not limited to George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Thomas Jefferson.
 

Third and Fourth

Build a Tree
Ranger Jared
Available Monday, Tuesday and Friday
30 minutes

By acting out the different parts of a tree and using diagrams, the students will be able to understand how trees take up nutrients and water through their different layers and cope with changes in their environment. Students will also learn about identifying different species of trees.

State Standards:

  • 3-LS3-1 Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles.
  • 2-LS2-2 develops a simple model that mimics the function of an animal in dispersing seeds or pollinating plants.
  • 1-1S1-1 Design solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants and/or animals use external parts to survive, grow, and meet their needs.
  • 4-LS1-1Construct argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.
 

Third and Fourth


Shock and Awe
Ranger Reed
Available Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
45 minutes

Using Powerpoint and Static Electricity, students will gain an understanding of how energy can be transferred from place to place through lightning, wildfire, and even the human body! Using the causes and effects of these elements, students will be able to better understand the difference between Mother Nature's processes, and those caused by humans.

State Standards:

  • 3-PS2-3 Ask questions about cause and effect relationships of electric or magnetic interactions between two objects not in contact with each other.
  • 4-PS3-2 Make observations to provide evidence for how energy can be transferred from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents.
 

Third, Fourth and Fifth

The Mountain of Life
Ranger Jared
Available Monday, Tuesday and Friday
30 minutes

Using the plants and animals of Mount Rushmore, students will arrange organisms in logical food chains and will be able to explain the transfer of energy from the sun through each link of the food chain. This program will require a multi-purpose room or gym.

State Standards:

  • 3-LS4-2 Use evidence to explain how the variations among individuals may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.
  • 3-LS4-3 Construct an argument with evidence how some organisms thrive, some struggle to survive, and some cannot survive in a particular habitat.
  • 3-LS4-4 make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.
  • 5-LS2-1 develop a model to describe the movement of matter and energy among producers, consumers, decomposers, and the environment.
 

Third, Fourth and Fifth

Disappeared: A Presidential Clue Adventure
Ranger Jared
Available Monday, Tuesday and Friday
45 minutes

In this activity students will attempt to solve a mystery as they learn about Presidents and Vice Presidents, places and events associated with their time in office, and how each of them shaped the United States.

State Standards:

  • 3. C.1.3. Students are able to explain the meaning and importance of the Constitution and Declaration of Independence.
  • 5. US.1.3. Students are able to identify influential people and key events during the American Revolution.
  • 5. US.1.4. Students are able to identify the key changes leading to and resulting from growth and invention in the U.S. between the Revolution and 1865.
  • 5.C.1.2. Students are able to define and describe the roles of democratic government of the United States.
 

Third, Fourth and Fifth

Lakota Culture Through Storytelling
Ranger Darrell
Available Monday, Wednesday and Friday
45 minutes

Using the story of Mother Nature as told by the Oglala Lakota people, students will listen to and identify the moral of Lakota stories that are told about Lakota life and participate in discussion about the lessons and morals of the story. Students will need pencils and paper for this program.

State Standards:

  • 4.RI.2 Determine main idea of text and explain how it is supported.
  • 4.RI.6 Compare and contrast a first hand and second hand account of same event or topic.
  • 4.RL.2 Determine a theme of a story.
  • 4.RL.3 Describe a character, setting or event in a story.
  • 4.RL.7 Make connections between text of a story and visual or oral presentation of the text.
 

Third, Fourth and Fifth

Traditional Lakota Arts
Ranger Darrell
Available Monday, Wednesday and Friday
45 minutes

Using the story of Mother Nature as told by the Oglala Lakota people, students will learn the traditional Lakota arts and designs through hands-on activities, tipis, drums & drumsticks, and dream catchers etc. Students will need paper, colored markers, colored pencils or crayons for this program.

State Standards:

  • 3.VA.Cn.10.1.a Create a work of art that is motivated by personal observation.
  • 4.VA.Cn.10.1.a Create works of art that reflect community cultural traditions.
  • 5.VA.Cn.10.1.a Apply formal and conceptual vocabularies of art and design to see surroundings in a new way.
 

Third, Fourth and Fifth

Lakota Language
Ranger Darrell
Available Monday, Wednesday and Friday
45 minutes

Using the story of Mother Nature as told by the Oglala Lakota people, students will learn Lakota language using Level One Lakota-based curriculum from the Lakota Language Consortium text book and flash cards. Students will need pencils and paper for this program.

World Language Standards:

Comparisons: Develop insight into nature of language and culture

  • 4.1 Demonstrate understanding of nature of language through comparisons.
  • 4.2 Demonstrate understanding of the concept of culture through comparisons.

Communities: Participate in multilingual communities at home and around the world.

  • 5.2 Show evidence of becoming life-long learners by using language for personal enrichment and enjoyment.

Last updated: February 8, 2018

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

13000 Highway 244
Building 31, Suite 1

Keystone, SD 57751

Phone:

(605) 574-2523
Park information. Phones are answered 7 days a week. Hours are 8:00 - 5:00 October through May, 8:00 - 10:00 June through mid-August and 8:00 - 9:00 mid-August through September. All times are Mountain Time.

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