Parks

Lower Mississippi Delta Region

National Parks, Historic Sites, and Recreation Areas in the Lower Mississippi Delta Region

Arkansas Post National Memorial
PARTIAL RECREATION OF WALL OF FORT SAN CARLOS III AND INTERPRETIVE PLAQUES DESCRIBING THE SKIRMISH WHICH TOOK PLACE HEREin ARKANSAS POST NATIONAL MEMORIAL DURING THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR

A Gathering Place

Located at the confluence of two rivers, Arkansas Post has served as a gathering place for many cultures throughout human history - it represents cultural cooperation, conflict, synthesis, and diversity.
 


Buffalo National River
Buffalo River

America's First National River

Established in 1972, Buffalo National River flows freely for 135 miles and is one of the few remaining undammed rivers in the lower 48 states. Once you arrive, prepare to journey from running rapids to quiet pools while surrounded by massive bluffs as you cruise through the Ozark Mountains down to the White River.


Cane River Creole National Historical Park
Oakland Main House from Allee

A River and Its People

The Cane River region is home to a unique culture; the Creoles. Generations of the same families of owners and workers, enslaved and tenant, lived on these lands for over 200 years. The park tells their stories and preserves the cultural landscape of Oakland and Magnolia Plantations, two of the most intact Creole cotton plantations in the United States.


Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site
Front facade of Little Rock Central High School.

The 1957 Desegregation Crisis at Central High School

Little Rock Central High School is recognized for the role it played in the desegregation of public schools in the United States. The nine African-American students' persistence in attending the formerly all-white Central High School was the most prominent national example of the implementation of the May 17, 1954 Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education.


Fort Donelson National Battlefield
Union reenactors firing muskets at Fort Donelson

"Fort Donelson will hereafter be marked in Capitals on the maps of our United Country..."

Brigadier General Ulysses S. Grant was becoming quite famous as he wrote these words following the surrender of Confederate Fort Donelson on Sunday, February 16, 1862. The Union victory at Fort Donelson elated the North, and stunned the South. Within days of the surrender, Clarksville and Nashville would fall into Union hands. Grant and his troops had created a pathway to victory for the Union. Read More


Fort Smith National Historic Site
North View of Fort Smith

Discover the Past

From the establishment of the first Fort Smith on December 25, 1817, to the final days of Judge Isaac C. Parker's jurisdiction over Indian Territory in 1896, Fort Smith National Historic Site preserves almost 80 years of history. 

Explore life on the edge of Indian Territory through the stories of soldiers, the Trail of Tears, dangerous outlaws, and the brave lawmen who pursued them.


Gulf Islands National Seashore
Fort Massachusetts on West Ship Island

The Lure of the Islands in the Gulf of Mexico

What is it that entices people to the sea? Poet John Masefield wrote, “I must go down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied.” Millions of visitors are drawn to the islands in the northern Gulf of Mexico for the white sandy beaches, the aquamarine waters, a boat ride, a camping spot, a tour of an old fort, or a place to fish. 


Hot Springs National Park
Hot Spring thermal water flowing into a display spring.

Hot springs in the middle of town?

Water. That's what first attracted people, and they have been coming here ever since to use these soothing thermal waters to heal and relax. Rich and poor alike came for the baths, and a thriving city built up around the hot springs. Together nicknamed "The American Spa," Hot Springs National Park today surrounds the north end of the city of Hot Springs, Arkansas.


Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve
Manor House at Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve

The Treasure of Jean Lafitte

In Jean Lafitte's day, silver and gold filled a pirate's treasure chest, but today's treasures are people, places, and memories. Discover New Orleans’ rich cultural mix. Learn Cajun traditions from people who live them. Watch an alligator bask on a bayou’s bank. Walk in the footsteps of the men who fought at 1815’s Battle of New Orleans. 


Jefferson National Expansion Memorial
The Gateway Arch grounds in the fall

Gateway to the West

The Gateway Arch reflects St. Louis' role in the Westward Expansion of the United States during the nineteenth century. The park is a memorial to Thomas Jefferson's role in opening the West, to the pioneers who helped shape its history, and to Dred Scott who sued for his freedom in the Old Courthouse.


Natchez National Historical Park
White iris  in front of a brick parterre with trees, and flowering shrubbery in the background

The Richest History On the Mississippi River

Discover the history of all the peoples of Natchez, Mississippi, from European settlement, African enslavement, the American cotton economy, to the Civil Rights struggle on the lower Mississippi River. Read More


Natchez Trace Parkway
The Old Trace at milepost 222 in Mississippi

A Drive through 10,000 Years of History

The Natchez Trace Parkway is a 444-mile recreational road and scenic drive through three states. It roughly follows the "Old Natchez Trace" a historic travel corridor used by American Indians, "Kaintucks," European settlers, slave traders, soldiers, and future presidents. Today, people can enjoy not only a scenic drive but also hiking, biking, horseback riding, and camping along the parkway.


New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park
Group of Every Kid In A Park participants at New Orleans Jazz National Park

Experience Jazz Music Where it all Began

Only in New Orleans could there be a National Park for jazz! Drop by our visitor center at the Old U.S. Mint to inquire about musical events around town. In the mood for a world class musical experience? Attend a jazz concert or ranger performance at the new state of the art performance venue on the 3rd floor of the Old U.S. Mint. Read More


Ozark National Scenic Riverways
Klepzig Mill in the fall

More Than Just the Rivers....

Ozark National Scenic Riverways is the first national park area to protect a river system. The Current and Jacks Fork Rivers are two of the finest floating rivers you'll find anywhere. Spring-fed, cold and clear they are a delight to canoe, swim, boat or fish. Besides these two famous rivers, the park is home to hundreds of freshwater springs, caves, trails and historic sites such as Alley Mill. Read More


Pea Ridge National Military Park
A fall view of the battlefield

The Battle That Saved Missouri For The Union

On March 7-8, 1862, 26,000 soldiers fought here to decide the fate of Missouri and the West. The 4,300 acre battlefield honors those who fought for their beliefs. Pea Ridge was one of the most pivotal Civil War battles and is the most intact Civil War battlefield in the United States. Read More


Shiloh National Military Park
Cannon in the fall at Corinth

An Epic Contest

Visit the sites of the most epic struggle in the Western Theater of the Civil War. Nearly 110,000 American troops clashed in a bloody contest that resulted in 23,746 casualties; more casualties than in all of America's previous wars combined. Explore both the Shiloh and Corinth battlefields to discover the impact of this struggle on the soldiers and on the nation.  Read More


President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National Historic Site
President Clinton Speaking at Dedication of Birthplace Home National Historic Site

"I still believe in a place called Hope." - President Clinton

On August 19, 1946, Virginia Blythe gave birth to her son, William Jefferson Blythe, III. Named for his father who died before he was born, he grew up to become William Jefferson Clinton - the 42nd president of the United States. In this house, he learned many of the early lessons that defined his life and his presidency.


Ulysses S Grant National Historic Site

Ulysses S. Grant House

A Place Called Home

Ulysses S. Grant is known as the victorious Civil War general who saved the Union and the 18th President of the United States. He first met Julia Dent, his future wife, at her family home, named White Haven. From 1854 to 1859 the Dents, Grants and an enslaved African-American workforce lived on the property.


Vicksburg National Military Park

Side view of armor and cannon of the USS Cairo

"Vicksburg is the nail head that holds the South's two halves together...Vicksburg is the key"

Two statements, two Presidents, both aware of the importance of the city on the Mississippi River. President Davis knew it was vital to hold the city for the Confederacy to survive. President Lincoln wanted the key to gain control of the river and divide the South. Vicksburg National Military Park commemorates this campaign and its significance as a critical turning point of the Civil War. Read More


Last updated: September 20, 2017