After Dark in the Park

After Dark in the Park
Special Speaker Presentations

Tuesdays at 7:00 p.m.
Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Park entrance fees apply
Presentations are free - suggested $2.00 donation supports park educational programs


 
 

 
Peter Vitousek, Ph.D.
Tuesday, December 12, 2017 - Pacific Islands as Models for Culture, Agriculture, and Sustainability

Peter Vitousek, Ph.D. looks to Hawai‘i and other Polynesian islands as models for living more sustainably. He shares his discoveries on the innovative intensive agricultural systems of pre-contact Hawai‘i and the implications to Hawaiian and Pacific societies in the past, present, and future.
 

 

January is Volcano Awareness Month

 
Lava dribbles into the ocean at the front of Kīlauea Volcano’s Kamokuna lava delta, October 2017
Lava dribbles into the ocean at the front of Kīlauea Volcano’s Kamokuna lava delta, October 2017

USGS Photo

Tuesday, January 9, 2018 - Kīlauea Volcano's East Rift Zone: 35 years and still erupting

January 3, 2018, marks the 35th anniversary of Kīlauea Volcano’s ongoing East Rift Zone eruption. During its first three years, high lava fountains erupted episodically from the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent. Since then, nearly continuous effusion of lava has sent countless ‘a‘ā and pāhoehoe flows downslope, burying about 55 square miles of the volcano’s south flank. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Carolyn Parcheta briefly describes the early history of this eruption and provides an in-depth look at lava flow activity during the past year, including the Kamokuna ocean entry and lava delta.
 

 
Kīlauea Volcano’s summit lava lake in foreground, with Mauna Loa in distant background, November 2016
Kīlauea Volcano’s summit lava lake in foreground, with Mauna Loa in distant background, November 2016

USGS Photo

Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - Kīlauea summit eruption: story of the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake

The story of Kīlauea Volcano’s ongoing summit eruption within Halemaʻumaʻu is the focus of a recently released USGS documentary that will be introduced by Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Janet Babb, who co-produced and co-wrote the video. The story recounts the formation and growth of the summit vent, describes the fluctuating lava lake within it, and features USGS scientists sharing their insights on various aspects of the eruption. Following the 24-minute video, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Matt Patrick, one of the featured scientists in it, will provide an update on what’s happening at Halemaʻumaʻu today and answer questions about the summit eruption.
 

 
USGS photo: Volcanic ash fallout in this bucket is a gold mine for HVO researchers
Volcanic ash fallout in this bucket is a gold mine for HVO researchers

USGS Photo

Tuesday, January 23, 2017 - Pacific Islands as Models for Culture, Agriculture, and Sustainability

Pele's hair, Pele's tears, and other ash are produced by bursting gas bubbles in the lava lake at Kīlauea’s summit. The amount of ash erupted daily ranges widely owing to short-term fluctuations in vigor of spattering. The monthly amount of ash, however, varies systematically with time, reflecting changing lake level, which, in turn, varies with the rate of magma supply. The methodical collecting of ash unexpectedly discovered a magma supply that pulses over several-month periods—the first such pulsing recognized at any volcano. This illustrated lecture, presented by USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Don Swanson, demonstrates how systematic, long-term collections can lead to surprising but fundamental discoveries.
 

 
USGS photo: Pu‘u Huluhulu, a forested Mauna Kea cinder cone surrounded by younger Mauna Loa lava flows, is at the crest of Saddle Road
Pu‘u Huluhulu, a forested Mauna Kea cinder cone surrounded by younger Mauna Loa lava flows, is at the crest of Saddle Road

USGS Photo

Tuesday, January 30, 2017 - Volcanic geology along Saddle Road on the Island of Hawaiʻi

The new Daniel K. Inouye Highway, Route 200, commonly called the Saddle Road, crosses the center of the Island of Hawaiʻi between its two largest volcanoes, Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea. Traveling this road takes you through a varied landscape of historically interesting geological features, including large and young lava flows, cinder cones, kipuka, and ancient ice age dune fields. This contrasting scenery shows outstanding examples of how Hawaiian volcanoes mature and age. Join Rick Hazlett, affiliate geologist with the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo, as he describes this “outdoor classroom” in which visitors can learn more about how our aloha ‘āina (precious land) came to be.
 

 

Last updated: December 12, 2017

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Hawaii National Park, HI 96718

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