News

Eclipse Poster

Partial Solar Eclipse at Great Sand Dunes


Though Great Sand Dunes is not in the path of total eclipse, the moon will cover 85% of the sun here in Southern Colorado! The sky will significantly darken, and the sun will appear as a crescent over the park.

The maximum eclipse will occur on Monday, August 21st at 11:46 am MST. Park rangers will be available on the back porch of the visitor center with NPS-approved eclipse viewers from 11:00 am-12:00 pm.

Kids can earn a Junior Ranger Eclipse Explorer badge by completing the special edition booklet available at the Visitor Center.

What is a Solar Eclipse?

A solar eclipse occurs when the moon blocks any part of the sun. On August 21, a solar eclipse will be visible (weather permitting) across all of North America. The whole continent will experience a partial eclipse lasting 2 to 3 hours. Halfway through the event, anyone within a 60 to 70 mile-wide path from Oregon to South Carolina will experience a total eclipse. During those brief moments when the moon completely blocks the sun’s bright face for up to 2 minutes 40 seconds, day will turn into night, making visible the otherwise hidden solar corona (the sun’s outer atmosphere). Bright stars and planets will become visible as well. In the partial eclipse at Great Sand Dunes, the sky will darken, but stars and planets will probably not become visible.

Safe Viewing Practices

Looking directly at the sun is unsafe, even in an 85% eclipse. The only safe way to look directly partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as eclipse glasses or handheld solar viewers. Homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses, even very dark ones, are not safe for looking at the sun. To date three manufacturers have certified that their eclipse glasses and hand-held solar viewers meet the ISO 12312-2 international standard for such products: Rainbow Symphony, American Paper Optics, and Thousand Oaks Optical.
Rangers will provide safe viewing glasses during the eclipse on the visitor center back porch. If you use your own viewing glasses, make sure they meet all the following criteria:

  • Have certification information with a designated ISO 12312-2 international standard
  • Have the manufacturer’s name and address printed somewhere on the product
  • Not older than three years, or have scratched or wrinkled lenses
  • Not homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses - even very dark ones - because they are not safe for looking directly at the Sun

Follow these practices to protect your eyes, camera, and phone:
  • Always supervise children using eclipse glasses or solar filters.
  • Stand still and cover your eyes with your eclipse glasses or solar viewer before looking up at the bright sun. After glancing at the sun, turn away and remove your filter - do not remove it while looking at the sun.
  • Do not look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars, or other optical device.
  • Do not look at the sun through a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device while using your eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewer - the concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eye(s), causing serious injury.
  • Do not point a camera or phone at the sun unless the optics are fitted with a certified solar filter. Optics can magnify the intensity and brightness of sunlight, causing damage to your sensor.


By following these guidelines, you can safely enjoy the view and be rewarded with memories to last a lifetime!


_____________________________

For Immediate Release – August 14, 2017
Katherine Faz: 719-378-6341

The Lightning-caused Castle Creek Fire at Great Sand Dunes is Out

The lightning-caused Castle Creek fire in the Sangre de Cristo Wilderness Area of Great Sand Dunes National Preserve was called out on August 8. The determination was based on an absence of discernable fire activity, consistent monsoonal rains and the lack of a detectable heat source during a recent infrared overflight by the Division of Fire Prevention and Control’s Multi-mission Aircraft.

The fire had been burning at 11,000 feet in steep and rough terrain and posed minimal impacts to visitors. Since July 12 when the fire started, fire personnel tracked its behavior and implemented management strategies considering access to the remote terrain, safety of firefighters, available resources, as well as observed and expected fire behavior.

The National Park Service wishes to thank the San Luis Valley Interagency Fire Management Unit and the Pike and San Isabel National Forests for their assistance in the management of the Castle Creek Fire.

Wildland fires at Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve contribute to healthy forest ecosystems. The National Park Service uses wildland fires as a tool to restore fire’s role as a dynamic and necessary natural process in maintaining healthy and sustainable ecosystems while protecting lives, property and natural and cultural resources. To learn more about fire management in national park units, visit www.nps.gov/fire

-NPS-
___________________________

For Immediate Release – August 2, 2017
Katherine Faz: 719-378-6341

Great Sand Dunes Celebrates Junior Ranger Day


Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve is celebrating Junior Ranger Day this Saturday, August 5, 2017. Activities will take place from 9:00am to 1:00pm at the South Ramada Picnic Area. Participants will have the opportunity to earn patches, pedometers and T-shirts after completing a variety of activities. Families and children of all ages are welcome and there no fees or reservations are required to participate.

Orientation, prize, and activity tables will be set up at the South Ramada Picnic Area, adjacent to the Dunes Parking Area. Participants should park at the Dunes Parking Area and follow signs to the South Ramada Picnic Area. Park Rangers and volunteers will be available to provide general information and a map of the activities. This year, Great Sand Dunes has organized the following activities for kids to participate in:

  • Learn about mountain lions, pronghorns, and a variety of insects at the “Animal Obstacle Course.”
  • Stop by the “Touch Table” station to learn more about artifacts, rocks, and other exciting items that have been found in the park.
  • Try on the uniform that best suits you and explore careers with the National Park Service at the “Ranger Station.”
  • In an effort to promote physical activity in National Parks, the Friends of the Dunes will provide pedometers for Junior Rangers to participate in “Steps for Stamps” =- walk or hike 2,000 steps (1 mile) with a pedometer and earn a sticker.
  • Look for plants, animals, and unique features in the dunes as part of the “Scavenger Hunt.”


Junior Rangers will collect a sticker after completing each activity and pick up prizes at the South Ramada picnic area.

This event is made possible with generous support from the Friends of the Dunes and the staff and volunteers at Great Sand Dunes. The Friends of the Dunes is a non-profit organization committed to supporting research and education at Great Sand Dunes.

For more information on Junior Ranger Day and other programs and special events at Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, please visit www.nps.gov/grsa or call the visitor center at 719-378-6395.

________________________
For Immediate Release – July 19, 2017
Katherine Faz: 719-378-6341

Park Continues to Manage the Lightning-caused Castle Creek Fire


The Castle Creek fire started approximately at 4:00pm on July 12 near the area burned in the 2010 Medano fire in the Sangre de Cristo Wilderness Area of Great Sand Dunes National Preserve. The half-acre lightning-caused fire is burning at 11,000 feet in steep and rough terrain and poses minimal impacts to visitors. The National Park Service, in cooperation with the San Luis Valley Interagency Fire Management Unit and the Pike and San Isabel National Forests, continues to manage the Castle Creek Fire in the Sangre De Cristo Wilderness Area within the Great Sand Dunes National Preserve.

Fire personnel developed short and long term management strategies while tracking its ignition. The recent precipitation since July 12 has been 1.96 inches at that elevation due to the summer monsoon season which has contributed to a decrease in fire behavior. On Sunday, July 16, an infrared overflight by the Division of Fire Prevention and Control’s Multi-mission Aircraft detected only one heat source. At this time, fire personnel continue to track the fire behavior and implement management strategies taking into consideration access to the remote terrain, safety of firefighters, available resources, as well as current and expected fire behavior.

Wildland fires at Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve contribute to healthy forest ecosystems. The National Park Service uses wildland fires as a tool to restore fire’s role as a dynamic and necessary natural process in maintaining healthy and sustainable ecosystems while protecting lives, property and natural and cultural resources. To learn more about fire management in national park units, visit www.nps.gov/fire

Great Sand Dunes will continue to provide updates on significant management decisions on the park’s website. For more information on the Castle Creek fire, contact Kathy Faz, Public Information Officer, at 719-582-0258.

-NPS-

_____________
For Immediate Release – July 14, 2017
Katherine Faz: 719-378-6341

Park Manages Lightning-caused Castle Creek Fire


The National Park Service, in cooperation with the San Luis Valley Interagency Fire Management Unit and the Pike and San Isabel National Forests, is actively managing the lightning-caused Castle Creek Fire in the Sangre De Cristo Wilderness Area within the Great Sand Dunes National Preserve. Adjacent to the 2010 Medano Fire burn scar, the fire is burning at an approximate elevation of 11,000’ in steep and rough terrain. The fire started at approximately 4 pm on July 12 in mixed conifer vegetation.
The fire is estimated at one-half acre. Currently, there are no natural or cultural resources at risk and there are only minimal impacts to visitors. Based on current fire activity and predicted weather this weekend, fire personnel will continue to develop short and long term management strategies while tracking fire behavior. Management strategies will consider access to the remote terrain, safety of firefighters, available resources, as well as current and expected fire behavior.
Wildland fires contribute to healthy forest ecosystems. Wildfires are often used as a tool to restore fire’s role as a dynamic and necessary natural process in maintaining healthy and sustainable ecosystems while protecting lives, property and natural and cultural resources. To learn more about fire management in national park units, visit www.nps.gov/fire
Great Sand Dunes will provide updates on significant management decisions on the park’s website. For more information on the Castle Creek fire, contact Kathy Faz, Public Information Officer, at 719-582-0258.
-NPS-
__________________
For Immediate Release

June 28, 2017

General Press inquiries: Katherine Faz, Public Information Officer, 719-582-0258 or kathy_faz@nps.gov

The Body of a Missing Hiker within Great Sand Dunes National Preserve is Identified


Today the Saguache County Coroner identified a body discovered by hikers in Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve as Bryan Skilinski of Phoenix, NY.

Skilinski was last seen on May 8, 2017 departing from the Sand Pit Picnic Area in the National Park. A park ranger discovered his vehicle parked in the lot and a multi-agency search effort was initiated. The search response was delayed because Skilinski did not obtain a permit or leave an itinerary of his trip with family and his destination or whereabouts were unknown.

Hikers discovered the deceased near Milwaukee Peak in the National Preserve on Monday and efforts were initiated to recover the victim’s body. Due to deep, heavy snow at lower elevations the area that Skilinski was located had not been searched by teams. Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve encompasses more than 140,000 acres including rugged high altitude and wilderness terrain.

The Coroner’s Office has not released a cause of death in the case and the incident remains under investigation. No foul play is suspected.

The park’s staff has been in close contact with the victim’s family since May and extends gratitude to the agencies that assisted with the search in May as well as the recovery. These agencies include: the Saguache County Sheriff’s Office, Saguache County Coroner, Custer County Sheriff’s Office, Saguache County Search and Rescue, Custer County Search and Rescue, Western Mountain Rescue, US Forest Service Monument Heli tack, Flight for Life, Colorado Division of Fire Prevention and Control’s Multi Mission Aircraft as well as dog teams from Larimer, Park and El Paso Counties.

Park visitors are encouraged to alert loved ones or park staff to their hiking plans when visiting remote locations.

Media inquiries should be directed to Public Information Officer, Kathy Faz at 719-582-0258.

-NPS-

Tourism to Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve creates $28 million in Economic Benefits

Report shows visitor spending supports 348 jobs in local economy

Mosca, CO – A new National Park Service (NPS) report shows that 388,807 visitors to Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve in 2016 spent $23,701,000 in communities near the park. That spending supported 348 jobs in the local area and had a cumulative benefit to the local economy of $28 million.

“We are delighted to share the story of this place and the experiences it provides”, said Acting Superintendent Scott Stonum. “NPS employees care for the parks and interpret the stories of these iconic natural, cultural and historic landscapes, but it takes our nearby communities to fully provide our visitors with food, lodging and other services that complete a national park experience.” In 2016, Great Sand Dunes saw a 30% increase in visitation due to increase media attention for the National Park Service Centennial celebrations, Medano creek flow, lower gas prices, and the increase in population within the state. The park supported a variety of programs and special events for the Centennial throughout the summer and fall months to accommodate the increase in visitors, which in turn contributed to more visitors enjoying the local community.

The report shows $18.4 billion of direct spending by 331 million park visitors in communities within 60 miles of a national park. This spending supported 318,000 jobs nationally; 271,544 of those jobs are found in these gateway communities. The cumulative benefit to the U.S. economy was $ 34.9 billion.

According to the 2016 report, most park visitor spending was for lodging (31.2 percent) followed by food and beverages (27.2 percent), gas and oil (11.7 percent), admissions and fees (10.2 percent), souvenirs and other expenses (9.7 percent), local transportation (7.4 percent), and camping fees (2.5%).

The peer-reviewed visitor spending analysis and interactive tool was created by economists Catherine Cullinane Thomas of the U.S. Geological Survey and Lynne Koontz of the National Park Service. Users can explore current year visitor spending, jobs, labor income, value added, and output effects by sector for national, state, and local economies, and also view year-by-year trend data. The interactive tool and report are available at the NPS Social Science Program webpage: go.nps.gov/vse.

To learn more about national parks in Colorado and how the National Park Service works with communities to help preserve local history, conserve the environment, and provide outdoor recreation, go to www.nps.gov/Colorado. For more information about the economic benefits of Great Sand Dunes, contact Kathy Faz at kathy_faz@nps.gov or 719-378-6341.

 
Kathy and Willa celebrate Every Kid in a Park
Great Sand Dunes Park Ranger, Kathy Faz, presents San Luis Valley 4th grader, Willa Seesz-Sanchez with her Every Kid in a Park free access pass.

Great Sand Dunes Welcomes 4th Grade Students through "Every Kid in a Park"

National Program Encourages Families and Classes to Visit National Parks

Great Sand Dunes invites all 4th grade students to visit the park for free as part of the "Every Kid in a Park" program. Fourth grade students can visit www.everykidinapark.gov to complete an activity and obtain a voucher. Bring your voucher to a National Park Service site and exchange it for a free annual entry pass to more than 2,000 federal recreation areas, including national park units, wildlife refuge areas, and US national forests! View full press release (pdf) >

 
facebook logo

Find us on Facebook for news about the natural world of the park, tips for visiting, the newest photos of each season and wildlife, visitor posts, interactive visitor questions with rangers, and more!

Last updated: August 18, 2017

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

Visitor Center
11999 State Highway 150

Mosca, CO 81146

Phone:

(719) 378-6395

Contact Us