Garden Journal - May to June 2018

Newly growing plants in the garden.
Jan Elder



This was the garden on May 11 when we planted squash, cucumbers, and tomatoes. At the far end of the garden you can see the early vegetables such as peas, radish, onions, and lettuce beginning to grow. The garden is off to a good start in 2018 and—except when the covering was blown off the plants—no rabbit damage!


 
Plants growing in a garden.
Jan Elder

And, 17 days later on Memorial Day Weekend, the garden looked like this. The tomato plants have doubled in size, tiny pea plants are now mature enough to produce pods. The squash plants not only survived but were beginning to produce tiny squash. Memorial Day Weekend heat was hard on the plants, but with daily watering the garden was doing well.

The plants grew so much during those 17 days, but so did the weeds! Jan spent several hours that weekend weeding, tying tomato plants to stakes, watering, and planting pole beans and corn.
 
Tomato and Squash in the 2018 garden.
Jan Elder
The plants grew so much during those 17 days, but so did the weeds! Jan spent several hours that weekend weeding, tying tomato plants to stakes, watering, and planting pole beans and corn.

Already it is mid-June and except for the lettuce plants wilting in the summer heat (the heat arrived VERY early this year), the garden is doing well (thanks to Ellen and volunteer Jana watering and weeding). As you can see everything is growing!

As mentioned in the last journal, summer squash is difficult for us to grow because the squash bugs always seem to get the upper hand. This year we've sprinkled flour on the plants, which we've heard kills squash bugs when they ingest it. Another technique Jan is trying in our efforts to successfully grow squash is to grow this vegetable in alternate years. We didn't have squash in the garden last year (we tried, but the small plants wilted and died). This year—so far—plants have not been attacked by squash bugs. We think that planting squash in alternate years, checking plants for squash bugs, and using sifted flour may give us success because….


 
We picked summer squash!!! Ellen used squash in a living history cooking demonstration on June 9. She has also been putting vegetables—including squash—in a basket at the front desk in the Visitor Center to share with visitors.
 
Four yellow summer squash on a table.
Jan Elder
 

The seeds have come up well in the garden and promise a good crop, especially onions – a great deal of corn has been planted in the county.  Hot beds have furnished plenty of lettuce and radishes and the gardens of young beets and spinach. Assistant Surgeon S. G. Cowdrey, May 1874

Last updated: July 31, 2018

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