2017 Solar Eclipse

Logo with text, Total Eclipse August 21, 2017
The 2017 Solar Eclipse Across America will be visible on August 21, 2017 across the continental United States. The center-line of the solar eclipse will pass just north of Fossil Butte National Monument, where we will be at 95% of totality.
 

Eclipse Weekend Activities

Join us on August 19, 20, and 21 for free eclipse events! All activities are located at the Fossil Butte National Moument Visitor Center.

Saturday, August 19

  • 9am: Eclipse Yoga - Free one hour Morning Yoga session! No prior experience needed and all ages are welcome for this outdoor yoga sesson. Mats are provided or bring your own.

  • 10am-3pm: Eclipse Drop In Programs: Stop in any time to participate in crafts, demonstrations, children’s activities, and more while learning about the Solar Eclipse! Presentations will be given at 12pm and 2pm.
  • 7pm: Star Party! Join us for a presenation by Paul Ricketts from the Department of Physics and Astromony at the University of Utah. Star. Star viewing with telescopes follows at 8pm. Late comers are welcome! Viewing continues until 11pm.
Sunday, August 20
  • 10am-3pm: Eclipse Drop In Programs: Stop in any time to participate in crafts, demonstrations, children’s activities, and more while learning about the Solar Eclipse! Presentations will be given at 12pm and 2pm.
Monday, August 21
  • 9am-12pm: Eclipse Drop In Programs: Stop in any time to participate in crafts, demonstrations, children’s activities, and more while learning about the Solar Eclipse!
  • 10am: Eclipse Watching Party - Join us at the monument for a clear view of the big event at 95% totality!
 
US Map with Total Solar Eclipse line of totality drawn from upper left to lower right

What is an eclipse?

A solar eclipse is a celestial event when the moon passes between the sun and Earth blocking all or part of the sun. At a given location, the event can last up to an hour and a half. For this eclipse, the longest period when the moon completely blocks the sun will be about two minutes and 40 seconds. The last total eclipse for the contiguous U.S. was in 1979, the next one will be in 2024.

To find out when the eclipse will be visible for your location check out NASA's Eclipse Website: https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/

Protect Your Eyes: Important Safety Information

Special viewing glasses are required in order to safely view the solar eclipse. A limited number of eclipse viewing glasses are available at the Visitor Center, but it is possible they may sell out before the event. It is best to purchase these items ahead of time and bring them with you to ensure you have them available to use. Never look at the sun without eclipse rated eyewear.

Eclipse viewing glasses and handheld solar viewers should meet all the following criteria:

  • Have certification information with a designated ISO 12312-2 international standard

  • Have the manufacturer’s name and address printed somewhere on the product

  • Not be used if they are older than three years, or have scratched or wrinkled lenses

  • Not use homemade filters or be substituted for with ordinary sunglasses -- not even very dark ones -- because they are not safe for looking directly at the Sun

For more information visit the National Park Service's eclipse safety page.

More Eclipse Information

Want to learn more? Check out these links!

NASA's Eclipse Page has fantastic and comprehensive site for everything you want to know about the 2017 eclipse.

NASA YouTube Video on the Total Eclipse helps you visualization of the path of the totality.

National Park Service's Eclipse Page give information about types of eclipses, sun safety, and NPS eclipse events.

American Astronomical Society Eclipse 2017 page has additional resources on why eclipses occur, information on eye safety, how to shoot pictures or videos of the eclipse, eclipse events, and much more.

Eclipse Megamovie simulates what the eclipse will look like in the skies above Dayville, Oregon. This website also provides more information about the Eclipse Megamovie. No matter where you decide to experience totality, you could be one of many citizen scientists gathering scientifically valuable data from the total solar eclipse.

Eclipse Weather Predictor is an interactive National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) website that predicts sky conditions for the eclipse.
 

Last updated: August 1, 2017

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

P.O. Box 592
Kemmerer, WY 83101

Phone:

(307) 877-4455

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